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class DogOwner {
    Dog dog;

    DogOwner(Dog dog) {
        this.dog = dog;
    }
}

class Dog {
    int age;

    Dog(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }
}

DogOwner peter = new DogOwner(new Dog(2));
Dog max = peter.dog;
max.age = 3;

System.out.println(peter.dog.age); // 3

How can I retreive max from peter without max being a reference to the Dog owned by peter? In other words, I would like to be able to set max's age to 3 without peter's Dog being changed.

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10  
But max is peter's Dog. You need a new Dog. –  Dave Newton Apr 18 '13 at 19:10
1  
My head's spinning...interesting twist... –  Nicolás Carlo Apr 18 '13 at 19:10
    
Are you looking for a clone? –  iamnotmaynard Apr 18 '13 at 19:11
2  
Sorry, you can't dereference a Java reference. –  aioobe Apr 18 '13 at 19:12
1  
@aioobe: That's exactly why I wrote dereference with ''. Since I did not know a better term. –  Aquillo Apr 18 '13 at 19:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You either have to clone peter.dog, or create a new instance based on it.

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beat me too it! –  Flynn Apr 18 '13 at 19:11
    
Ok thanks, I was looking for this function. I did not know the name though. Will accept asap. –  Aquillo Apr 18 '13 at 19:16

Implement clone method for Dog:

class Dog implements Cloneable
{
  public Dog clone()
  {
      try{
           return (Dog)super.clone();
      } catch (CloneNotSupportedException ex)
      {
           // should not happen
           return null;
      }
  }

}

Then the usage can look like:

Dog max = peter.dog.clone();
max.age = 3;
share|improve this answer
    
Since NilsH beat you to it, I will accept his answer. Since you took the time to come with an example, I will upvote :) –  Aquillo Apr 18 '13 at 19:18
2  
Note that with this technique, you are essentially using 'Object.clone()', which will create a copy of the object with all primitive values the same, and all references pointing to the same external object. Thus, if Dog contained a reference to a mutable object, this clone technique would be inadequate. The external object would need to be cloned as well, and the references in the cloned Dog updated to the copies. –  Bailey S Apr 18 '13 at 19:26
    
@BaileyS: You're right. Thanks for make a note of it. Though in my case, that's exactly what I need. –  Aquillo Apr 18 '13 at 19:47

If you want peter.dog and max to evolve independently, they must be separate instances, which means you mus copy peter.dog instead of just assigning it to max.

You can create a copying constructor :

Dog(Dog otherDog) {
    this.age = otherDog.age;
}

and then

Dog max = new Dog(peter.dog);
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Look at this line:

Dog max = peter.dog;

Instead of this line, you can deep-copy peter.dog and then assign the copy to max, you are done, you can manipulate it freely.

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1  
How? The man needs to know how... –  Bailey S Apr 18 '13 at 19:29

max is already a reference to peter.dog. You can't just call Peter's dog "Max" and take the man's dog away! If you don't want him to be Peter's dog, you're going to have to get a new dog...

Dog max = new Dog(peter.dog.age);
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DogOwner peter = new DogOwner(new Dog("Max", 2)); //This creates two new objects
Dog max = peter.dog;//This sets a reference to one of those objects, somewhat indirectly

Because you have only one Dog object in your heap, you cannot possibly have the dog pointed to by the peter reference be a different dog from the one pointed to by the reference max. You must create a new Dog by either cloning peter's dog or creating a new one wholesale.

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This answer is confusing. –  Bailey S Apr 18 '13 at 19:28
    
If you enlighten me as to how you're confused, I will attempt to clarify. –  Nathaniel Ford Apr 18 '13 at 19:39

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