Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This thread, Decorator pattern implementation, has an implementation of a decorator using abstract classes. I don't like it for the simple fact that a CondimentDecorator is NOT a Beverage in the implementation given there. I'd use interfaces instead. Aren't abstract classes better for is-a relationships, and interfaces better for has-a relationships?

public interface IBeverage
{
    // get a description of the beverage
    String Description { get; }

    // calculate cost of the beverage
    double Cost { get; }
}

// HouseBlend coffee implements IBeverage
public class HouseBlend : IBeverage
{
    private string description;
    public String Description
    {
        get { return description; }
    }

    private double cost;
    public double Cost
    {
        get { return cost; }
    }

    // Constructor
    public HouseBlend() { description = "House Blend"; cost = 0.89;  }
}

// DarkRoast coffee implements IBeverage
public class DarkRoast : IBeverage
{
    private string description;
    public String Description
    {
        get { return description; }
    }

    private double cost;
    public double Cost
    {
        get { return cost;  }
    }

    // Constructor
    public DarkRoast() { description = "Dark Roast"; cost = 1.10; }
}

// Mocha is a Decorator
public class Mocha
{
    // Mocha has-a Beverage
    private IBeverage m_beverage;

    private string description;
    public String Description
    {
        get { return description; }
    }

    private public double Cost
    {
        get { return cost; }
    }

    // Constructor binds the object passed to member var
    public Mocha(IBeverage beverage)
    {
        m_beverage = beverage; // not necessary for the purpose of this example
        description = m_beverage.Description + ", Mocha";
        cost = 0.20 + m_beverage.Cost;
    }
}

Use like this:
    Mocha mhb = new Mocha(new HouseBlend()); // house blend with mocha flavor
share|improve this question
    
This is probably a better fit for programmers.stackexchange.com –  J... Apr 18 '13 at 19:40
    
I completely agree, but that wasn't the point of the question you're referring to. –  Paul Sasik Apr 18 '13 at 19:45
1  
Yes, burning your one and only base class on something that is not an is-a relationship is a bad idea. –  Matt Smith Apr 18 '13 at 19:45
    
I guess the problem comes when you want to pass a Mocha object to something that wants an IBeverage. How to do that? I guess you'd really a Mocha class that implements IBeverage and that uses a MochaDecorator to help with the implementation. –  Matthew Watson Apr 18 '13 at 20:04
    
If you add a MochaDecorator for the Description and Cost and used that in the Mocha class implementing IBeverage, you wouldn't need the Description and Cost in the Mocha class. But they're required to be implemented by IBeverage! Won't work. Maybe it's just the name "CondimentDecorator" that confused me. How about BeverageDecorator, which gives you a new type of beverage, but it's still a beverage. So Mocha would indeed implement IBeverage. But in that case, I don't need an extra BeverageDecorator class at all. Mocha is now called MochaDecorator and I'm done. –  Scott Apr 18 '13 at 21:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both base clases and interfaces are frequently used to model is-a relationships. Even an interface as simple as IDisposable can be understood as "is an object with a manually controlled lifecycle", a "disposable". The more tangible differences are in whether base implementation or data fields are allowed; and in their ability to combine multiple hierarchies.

Now, when you are implementing any pattern, you usually have enough information to see whether you need data fields or not. However, you will hardly ever be able to rule out a future need to involve the same classes in additional patterns as your software grows. From that perspective, a general preference of interfaces over abstract classes gives you more long term flexibility - whenever you have a choice.

By the nature of a Decorator, you have a choice. The components typically do not have a predefined order of how they should nest. If they did, you would use inheritance directly, instead of components. So you should prefer interfaces to compose a Decorator.

All that said, your original argument is valid as well. Decorator components (features) can be understood as is-a relationships if you like; but it is not the most natural way of looking at them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.