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I have a class that connects to a USB device in the constructor. If the device isn't present or some other situation fails then the constructor throws an exception and the calling code deals with it.

Something akin to:

CDevice* pDevice = NULL;
try
{
    pDevice = new CDevice();
}

and so on. I would like to replace this call with an auto_ptr but am not clear how to trap the exception while maintaining the correct scope of the object.

share|improve this question
    
If you're using C++11, auto_ptr is deprecated. If C++03, there's still TR1 and Boost. – chris Apr 18 '13 at 20:07
    
you want to inspect the object after its constructor throw? – yngum Apr 18 '13 at 20:18
up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, I recommend you don't use auto_ptr, it's somewhat broken and has been deprecated in C++11. Prefer either Boost or C++11 SBRM classes like std::unique_ptr. You can do this without much modification to your example.

std::unique_ptr<CDevice> pDevice;
try
{
    pDevice.reset(new CDevice());
}
catch(...)
{
    //....
}

If new or the constructor of CDevice throws then pDevice will remain empty. Using auto_ptr isn't much different, just not recommended given the available alternatives.

std::auto_ptr<CDevice> pDevice;

try
{
    pDevice.reset(new CDevice());

    //pDevice = std::auto_ptr<CDevice>(new CDevice());
    // ^^ historical masochism. 
}
catch(...)
{
    //....
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seems like I will have an unhandled exception in the first creation of the pointer now. – ethrbunny Apr 18 '13 at 20:09
    
Creation of that pointer doesn't throw. – Drew Dormann Apr 18 '13 at 20:11
    
@ethrbunny: the default constructor is explicitly noexcept, meaning it will never ever throw. – rubenvb Apr 18 '13 at 20:11
1  
@ethrbunny I've included an example for auto_ptr that should get be what you're looking for. – Captain Obvlious Apr 18 '13 at 20:39
1  
Your auto_ptr example could use the reset() method as well. – Dave S Apr 18 '13 at 20:40

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