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here is a piece of code which compiles fine but is giving segmentation fault at run time. can anybody tell me how to get around this problem. the code is implementing rm system call in C.

#include<sys/stat.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<dirent.h>
#include<error.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>


int rmq(char*pth)
{
  char path[1000]; //hold the file name to be removed
  strcpy(path,pth);
  char *b; // stores the complete path of the file to be removed
  struct dirent *d;
  DIR *dir;

  char cwd[256]; //holds current working directory
  getcwd(cwd, sizeof(cwd));  
  dir = opendir(cwd);
  char path1[1000]; //for recursively moving through dir and subdir
  strcpy(path1,cwd);

  char newp[1000];
  struct stat buf;

  while((d = readdir(dir))) //if there are directories to be read 
  {  
     if(!strcmp(d->d_name,".") || !strcmp(d->d_name,"..")) // skip "." and ".."
     continue;

     //appends directory read to cwd

     strcpy(newp,path1); 
     strcat(newp,"/");
     strcat(newp,d->d_name); 
     //printf("%s>>",d->d_name);

     if(stat(newp,&buf)==-1) // puts file info in buf
        perror("stat");
     if(S_ISDIR(buf.st_mode))// if directory, then add a "/" to current path
     { 
     //if a directory then call function again(recursion)
        strcat(path1,"/");
        strcat(path1,d->d_name);
        rmq(path1);
     }
     else{ 
        //if directory current read is the one to be removed
        if((strcmp(path, d->d_name)) == 0){
        // append it with cwd & put it in b
        b = malloc(25 + strlen(d->d_name) + 1);
        sprintf(b, "%s/%s", "/home/urwa/Documents/OPS", d->d_name);
        remove(b); // remove that file
        free(b);
        }
     } 
 }
 return 0;
}


int main(){
   char cwd[256];
   getcwd(cwd, sizeof(cwd));

   char *argv[2];
   argv[1] = "dumbledore.txt";
   rmq(argv[1]); // file to be removed is passed as parameter
   return 0;
} 

i tried malloc but it didnt solve the problem

share|improve this question
2  
Fire up gdb and identify the line where it's failing: cs.cmu.edu/~gilpin/tutorial –  paulsm4 Apr 18 '13 at 20:15
1  
Pay attention to the compiler warnings. If you have warnings, your code does not compile fine. –  n.m. Apr 18 '13 at 20:22
2  
You're trying to sprintf to b, which is a char, what did you expect was going to happen? –  Blindy Apr 18 '13 at 20:25
2  
The indentation of this source code sucks. Pardon the French. You should take some time to make it easy for us to diagnose your problem, shouldn't you? –  Jens Apr 18 '13 at 20:47
    
sorry for the indentation. i have improved that now. –  user128806 Apr 18 '13 at 21:42

1 Answer 1

You should definitely compile your code with the -Wall -Wextra flags to better benefit from the compiler help. Here, with your code you would get the following warnings:

test.c: In function ‘rmq’:
test.c:9:4: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘strcpy’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
test.c:9:4: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strcpy’ [enabled by default]
test.c:25:3: warning: suggest parentheses around assignment used as truth value [-Wparentheses]
test.c:26:3: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘strcmp’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
test.c:30:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘strcat’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
test.c:30:5: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘strcat’ [enabled by default]
test.c:34:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘perror’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
test.c:43:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘sprintf’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
test.c:43:5: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘sprintf’ [enabled by default]
test.c:43:5: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘sprintf’ makes pointer from integer without a cast [enabled by default]
test.c:43:5: note: expected ‘char *’ but argument is of type ‘char’
test.c:44:5: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘remove’ [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:58:2: warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type]
test.c: In function ‘rmq’:
test.c:43:12: warning: ‘b’ may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]

So, the best way to solve everything is to do the following:

  • First, there are missing includes:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>
    
  • Add extra parentheses around the assignment in the while test (needed by the compiler to ensure that you know what you do):

    while((d = readdir(dir))){

  • You need to transform the char b; into a char *b; and to allocate/deallocate the necessary memory to store the string:

    if((strcmp(path, d->d_name)) == 0){
      b = malloc(25 + strlen(d->d_name) + 1);
      sprintf(b, "%s/%s", "/home/urwa/Documents/OPS", d->d_name);
      remove(b);
      free(b);
    }
    
  • Then, you need to add return 0 to the main function in order to match the signature that you have defined.

Once you have done all this, there is still a bug because you missed to treat a few cases. Try to fix it with gdb and/or valgrind (think to set the -g option when compiling).

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer. This leads to learning. –  Michael Dorgan Apr 18 '13 at 22:09
    
@perror so i improved the code as you mentioned. But it is still giving segmentation fault. –  user128806 Apr 19 '13 at 0:11
    
@user128806: The segfault occurs because you are saturating the stack with an infinite loop (you are calling rmq again and again). You MUST learn to use gdb and valgrind if you want to progress in C. –  perror Apr 19 '13 at 7:09
    
@perror. is there a way out of it.without suing gdb.. i have submission at mid night and right now i dnt have time to learn how to use gdb:/ –  user128806 Apr 19 '13 at 13:37

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