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I have a large matrix, I'd like to check that it has a column of all zeros somewhere in it. How to do that in numpy?

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If there is a column of zeros, do you need the column index, or do you just need "yes or no"? –  Warren Weckesser Apr 18 '13 at 20:38
    
@WarrenWeckesser yes or no –  siamii Apr 18 '13 at 20:39
    
A bad way :: Try to invert it :-P (if it has a column of all zeros, it's singular) –  mgilson Apr 18 '13 at 20:41
    
@mgilson: Inverting the matrix is not a good test of "has a 0 column": [[1, 1], [1, 1]] cannot be inverted, for example. –  EOL Apr 19 '13 at 3:29
    
@EOL -- I did preface my comment by "A bad way" ... I also didn't post it as an answer as It certainly wasn't worth an answer. I suppose that I just wanted to inject a small bit of linear algebra into our mundane programming lives ... :-). But, FWIW, I'm glad you're keeping me honest. –  mgilson Apr 19 '13 at 3:35

2 Answers 2

Here's one way:

In [19]: a
Out[19]: 
array([[9, 4, 0, 0, 7, 2, 0, 4, 0, 1, 2],
       [0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 7, 6, 0, 6, 2, 0],
       [6, 8, 0, 4, 0, 6, 2, 0, 8, 0, 3],
       [5, 4, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 3, 8]])

In [20]: (~a.any(axis=0)).any()
Out[20]: True

If you later decide that you need the column index:

In [26]: numpy.where(~a.any(axis=0))[0]
Out[26]: array([2])
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what's where? ok, it's referring to numpy.where –  siamii Apr 18 '13 at 21:00
    
Yes, that's numpy.where; code fixed to be explicit. –  Warren Weckesser Apr 19 '13 at 2:22

Create an equals 0 mask (mat == 0), and run all on it along an axis.

(mat == 0).all(axis=0).any()
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Warren Weckesser's solution is likely to be faster, because any() probably stops checking non-zero lines very early, whereas mat == 0 performs the comparison on every single element of the array, which is slower. –  EOL Apr 19 '13 at 3:27
1  
@EOL yes i agree. also mat == 0 creates a temporary bool array with the same shape as mat, whereas Warren's mat.any(axis=0) only creates a temporary 1d array of size mat.shape[1], which is another reason for my solution to be slower (but perhaps a bit more readable for some). –  shx2 Apr 19 '13 at 7:48
1  
This approach has the advantage that it's more easily generalizable to more complex conditions. –  DSM May 15 '13 at 11:08

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