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I have the 64-bit linux distro of the JRE (1.6_34) installed installed on a CentOS server. I pulled down the source code and drilled down into the java.net.SocketInputStream class.

That class has a method called socketRead0:

/** 
 * Reads into an array of bytes at the specified offset using
 * the received socket primitive. 
 * @param fd the FileDescriptor
 * @param b the buffer into which the data is read
 * @param off the start offset of the data
 * @param len the maximum number of bytes read
 * @param timeout the read timeout in ms
 * @return the actual number of bytes read, -1 is
 *          returned when the end of the stream is reached. 
 * @exception IOException If an I/O error has occurred.
*/
private native int socketRead0(FileDescriptor fd, 
        byte b[], int off, int len, int timeout)
        throws IOException;

Where can I find the native source code that gets executed when this SocketInputStream#socketRead0 method is executed? Thanks in advance!

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You would need to download the JVM source to find the corresponding native code which implements socketRead0. –  technomage Apr 19 '13 at 0:26
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3 Answers

In OpenJDK it is here For some reason I cant find the Linux implementation. Typically search for a native folder. Your file will be in it

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Thanks @jogabonito (+1) - perhaps here: <myJavaHome>/jdk/1.6.34/jdk1.6.0_34/jre/lib/amd64/libnet.so? –  user1768830 Apr 20 '13 at 11:02
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As explained in the other answers, native methods are actually C functions, invoked through JNI. The library files containing the C functions are usually loaded with System.loadLibrary and exports that follow the JNI naming scheme (prefixed with Java_, followed by the package, the class and the method name, with underscores instead of dots) are automatically linked to those native Java methods.

However, the other answers don't mention a second way to link C functions to native Java methods: RegisterNatives. This interface can be used to provide C implementations without ever calling System.loadLibrary, using the JNI naming scheme or even exporting those functions.

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+1 for RegisterNatives (thanks for the info, did not know this), but "The DLLs" This question is tagged linux. –  m0skit0 Apr 20 '13 at 15:12
    
@m0skit0 Oops, didn't notice that... –  main-- Apr 20 '13 at 16:58
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A native method indicates this method is not Java code, but native code -a.k.a. machine code- and usually written in C/C++. Calls to such functions is made through JNI.

You should search for where it loads the native libraries it uses, which looks like

System.loadLibrary("nameOfLibrary");

This native library should export functions for Java like

JNIEXPORT returnType JNICALL Java_ClassName_methodName
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Thanks @m0skit0 (+1) - where would I find this call to System.loadLibrary? –  user1768830 Apr 18 '13 at 22:15
    
I might guess that class should do it, but I really don't know. Do a search on the source. –  m0skit0 Apr 18 '13 at 22:31
1  
The JVM doesn't load all its own native code. Much of it is already part of the JVM. –  EJP Apr 20 '13 at 0:12
    
your java class should have the loadLibrary call as a part of static block,and corresponding dll or shared object should be avialable. –  johnkrishna Apr 20 '13 at 5:14
    
Thanks @EJP (+1) - please see my comment underneath jogabonito's answer - I have the same question for you! –  user1768830 Apr 20 '13 at 11:02
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