Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How best can I check if an integer is even or odd in C? I considered how I'd do this in Java, but I couldn't come up with an answer either. Thanks.

share|improve this question
2  
The version that uses bitwise and (&) is much more efficient than the modulo (%) version. You should change the one you selected as the correct answer. –  Stefan Rusek Oct 2 '08 at 11:11
6  
Unlikely to matter - argument is a constant. Easy for the optimizer –  MSalters Oct 2 '08 at 11:20
1  
Readability factors into this as well. –  Brian G Oct 2 '08 at 12:39
21  
@Stefan Rusek: bullshit :) –  freespace Oct 3 '08 at 7:01
2  
In embedded applications (the world where I spend most of my programming time), some processors have very primitive arithmetic units and cannot do division/modulus operations easily. For this reason, I usually use the bitwise-and method instead. However, on a modern desktop's CPU this won't be the case. –  bta Feb 26 '10 at 23:04

25 Answers 25

up vote 296 down vote accepted

Use the modulo (%) operator to check if there's a remainder when dividing by 2:

if (x % 2) { /* x is odd */ }

A few people have criticized my answer above stating that using x & 1 is "faster" or "more efficient". I do not believe this to be the case.

Out of curiosity, I created two trivial test case programs:

/* modulo.c */
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int x;
    for (x = 0; x < 10; x++)
        if (x % 2)
            printf("%d is odd\n", x);
    return 0;
}

/* and.c */
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int x;
    for (x = 0; x < 10; x++)
        if (x & 1)
            printf("%d is odd\n", x);
    return 0;
}

I then compiled these with gcc 4.1.3 on one of my machines 5 different times:

  • With no optimization flags.
  • With -O
  • With -Os
  • With -O2
  • With -O3

I examined the assembly output of each compile (using gcc -S) and found that in each case, the output for and.c and modulo.c were identical (they both used the andl $1, %eax instruction). I doubt this is a "new" feature, and I suspect it dates back to ancient versions. I also doubt any modern (made in the past 20 years) non-arcane compiler, commercial or open source, lacks such optimization. I would test on other compilers, but I don't have any available at the moment.

If anyone else would care to test other compilers and/or platform targets, and gets a different result, I'd be very interested to know.

Finally, the modulo version is guaranteed by the standard to work whether the integer is positive, negative or zero, regardless of the implementation's representation of signed integers. The bitwise-and version is not. Yes, I realise two's complement is somewhat ubiquitous, so this is not really an issue.

share|improve this answer
3  
The question specifically asked how to do it in C so I answered it in C, despite chustar mentioning they couldn't work out how to do it in Java. I did not claim or imply this was a Java answer, I do not know Java. I think I just got my first downvote and am confused as to why. Oh well. –  Chris Young Oct 2 '08 at 5:49
17  
I'd say, if (x % 2 != 0) { /* x is odd */ }, but who knows. Do not know java either. –  eugensk00 Oct 2 '08 at 6:00
7  
It's getting lots of upvotes to distinguish it from the bitwise operator morons, without having to spend our karma voting them down. –  wnoise Oct 2 '08 at 22:21
5  
I agree with everything, except one thing: I like to keep integers and truth values separate, conceptually, so I prefer to write "if (x % 2 == 1)". It's the same to the compiler, but perhaps a bit clearer to humans. Plus you can use the same code in languages that don't interpret non-zero as true. –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 13 '08 at 5:48
27  
My benchmark? What benchmark? I didn't do any benchmarking. I examined the generated assembly language. This has absolutely nothing to do with printf. –  Chris Young Aug 5 '09 at 12:48

You guys are waaaaaaaay too efficient. What you really want is:

public boolean isOdd(int num) {
  int i = 0;
  boolean odd = false;

  while (i != num) {
    odd = !odd
    i = i + 1;
  }

  return odd;
}

Repeat for isEven.

Of course, that doesn't work for negative numbers. But with brilliance comes sacrifice...

share|improve this answer
14  
Up vote for making me grin first thing in the morning. Stackoverflow should give a badge for worst conceiveable answer / most entertaining answer. –  Shane MacLaughlin Oct 2 '08 at 6:39
7  
SO needs a "WTF?" flag as well as "offensive?", that would fix it :) –  Tom Oct 2 '08 at 7:10
38  
Brilliant - positively enterprisey –  Duncan Smart Oct 2 '08 at 11:04
8  
If you threw an argument exception on negative values, and noted in the documentation that this function is O(N), then I would just fine with this. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 2 '08 at 15:20
21  
You should optimise this with a look-up table. –  Weeble Feb 27 '10 at 2:45

Use bit arithmetic:

if((x & 1) == 0)
    printf("EVEN!\n");
else
    printf("ODD!\n");

This is faster than using division or modulus.

share|improve this answer
25  
I don't think it's fair to say it's faster than using division or modulus. The C standard doesn't say anything about performance of operators, and any decent compiler will produce fast code for either. I would personally choose the idiom that communicates my intent, and % seems more appropriate here –  Chris Young Oct 2 '08 at 5:06
12  
I like (x & 1) better, because it checks whether the number is even the same way people do: check if the last digit is even or odd. In my opinion it communicates its intent more than the modulo method. (Not that it matters much.) –  Jeremy Ruten Oct 2 '08 at 5:22
2  
You're right, I guess it's subjective. Though the usual definition of "even" is "integer that's divisible by 2", not "integer that ends in 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8". :-) –  Chris Young Oct 2 '08 at 6:04
4  
@TraumaPony - for ANSI standard C and early Java, depends on the computer system. It's unspecified what representation is used for signed numbers -- 2's compliment, 1's compliment, grey-coded, etc. But modulus is always modulus –  Aaron Oct 2 '08 at 9:07
5  
Doesn't work universally for negative numbers. See Check this answer for more detail: stackoverflow.com/questions/160930/… for details. –  Andrew Edgecombe Oct 2 '08 at 10:14

[Joke mode="on"]

public enum Evenness
{
  Unknown = 0,
  Even = 1,
  Odd = 2
}

public static Evenness AnalyzeEvenness(object o)
{

  if (o == null)
    return Evenness.Unknown;

  string foo = o.ToString();

  if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(foo))
    return Evenness.Unknown;

  char bar = foo[foo.Length - 1];

  switch (bar)
  {
     case '0':
     case '2':
     case '4':
     case '6':
     case '8':
       return Evenness.Even;
     case '1':
     case '3':
     case '5':
     case '7':
     case '9':
       return Evenness.Odd;
     default:
       return Evenness.Unknown;
  }
}

[Joke mode="off"]

EDIT: Added confusing values to the enum.

share|improve this answer
2  
Wow... this is more demented than SCdF's solution! Kudos! No upvote though... can't recommend this. But thanks for the funny! –  Wes P Oct 2 '08 at 12:19
1  
The advantage of this approach is it works with more than just numbers. Also, if you replace this line: char bar = foo[foo.Length - 1]; with this: double bar = Char.GetNumericValue(foo[foo.Length - 1]); Then it will work with any number system. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 2 '08 at 15:27
4  
bug report: 14.65 is reported as odd when it should be unknown. –  TheSoftwareJedi Oct 22 '08 at 14:55
3  
Software Jedi, it's a "feature". ;) –  Sklivvz Oct 23 '08 at 13:01
14  
TheSoftwareJedi: 14.65 is one of the oddest integers I've ever seen. –  Bruce Alderman Nov 19 '08 at 21:44

A nice one is:

/*forward declaration, C compiles in one pass*/
bool isOdd(unsigned int n);

bool isEven(unsigned int n)
{
  if (n == 0) 
    return true ;  // I know 0 is even
  else
    return isOdd(n-1) ; // n is even if n-1 is odd
}

bool isOdd(unsigned int n)
{
  if (n == 0)
    return false ;
  else
    return isEven(n-1) ; // n is odd if n-1 is even
}

Note that this method use tail recursion involving two functions. It can be implemented efficiently (turned into a while/until kind of loop) if your compiler supports tail recursion like a Scheme compiler. In this case the stack should not overflow !

share|improve this answer
1  
This does not handle isOdd(0) well. –  Steve McLeod Oct 2 '08 at 11:43
1  
I think you've got an infinite loop (with tail recursion) or a stack overflow (without tail recursion) for isOdd() with any even values or isEven() with any odd values. It only terminates with true. It's the halting problem all over again. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 2 '08 at 15:31
5  
Oh, sure, fix it with no comment, and make me look like an idiot. That's fine. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 3 '08 at 11:25
1  
Now, you've got a compile error: in isEven not all code paths return a value. No, I haven't actually tried this code, it's the compiler in my head that's complaining. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 3 '08 at 11:28
4  
compile error: not all paths return a value hate to bombard you with bug comments on your sample code, but what happens when you call isEven(5) –  Kevin Oct 22 '08 at 15:02

A number is even if, when divided by two, the remainder is 0. A number is odd if, when divided by 2, the remainder is 1.

// Java
public static boolean isOdd(int num){
    return num % 2 != 0;
}

/* C */
int isOdd(int num){
    return num % 2;
}

Methods are great!

share|improve this answer
    
Your Java method is broken because num % 2 == -1 for negative odd numbers. –  WMR Oct 22 '08 at 14:44
    
Is that why you downvoted me? –  jjnguy Oct 22 '08 at 14:45
3  
I downvoted it because your function in C takes more characters to type than what it does. IE num % I is 7 characters including the spaces IsOdd(I) is 8 characters. Why would you create a function that is longer than just doing the operation? –  Kevin Oct 22 '08 at 14:56
7  
@Kevin in my opinion code is not measured by chars but rather by the time it takes you to write it, including think + debug time. num % 2 takes a millisecond more to think of than isOdd. now add the numbers globally and you lost a collective year. also isOdd can be tested, and verified and eventually bug free certified (e.g. handling negative numbers) where as num % 2 - some developers will always have a doubt and go experimenting. good code is code you don't write, just reuse... just my 2 cents. –  Eran Medan May 10 '12 at 5:45
1  
@EranMedan, The same logic would apply to replacing i++ with IncrementByOne(i) and it is just as bad an idea. If a developer has doubt about what num % 2 does, I don't want him or her anywhere near my code. –  Kevin May 10 '12 at 18:21

In response to ffpf - I had exactly the same argument with a colleague years ago, and the answer is no it doesn't work with negative numbers.

The C standard stipulates that negative numbers can be represented in 3 ways: - 2's compliment - 1's compliment - "sign and magnitude".

Checking like this:

  isEven = (x & 1);

will work for 2's compliment and sign and magnitude formats, but not for 1's compliment.

However, I believe that the following will work for all cases:

  isEven = (x & 1) ^ ((-1 & 1) | ((x < 0) ? 0 : 1)));

edit: thanks to ffpf for pointing out that the text box was eating everything after my lessthan character!

share|improve this answer
    
I think your second code example is missing some text. –  Jeff Yates Oct 2 '08 at 17:23
1  
Let's compliment those numbers! –  thejh Mar 30 '13 at 11:00

One more solution to the problem
(children are welcome to vote)

bool isEven(unsigned int x)
{
  unsigned int half1 = 0, half2 = 0;
  while (x)
  {
     if (x) { half1++; x--; }
     if (x) { half2++; x--; }

  }
  return half1 == half2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
true but overkill –  Nathan Fellman Oct 2 '08 at 7:28
    
No, you are not the kind of child I counted on :) –  eugensk00 Oct 2 '08 at 7:38
    
I was going to upvote this, but it's a bit slow on negative numbers. :) –  Chris Young Oct 2 '08 at 9:24
2  
All numbers are bright and positive. Or are you prejudiced against some? :)) –  eugensk00 Oct 2 '08 at 11:19
2  
In computers, all numbers once negative, eventually become positive. We call it the Rollover of Happiness (not applicable to BIGNUMS, YMMY, not valid in all states). –  Will Hartung Oct 2 '08 at 15:18

I'd say just divide it by 2 and if there is a 0 remainder, it's even, otherwise it's odd.

Using the modulus (%) makes this easy.

eg. 4 % 2 = 0 therefore 4 is even 5 % 2 = 1 therefore 5 is odd

share|improve this answer
// C#
bool isEven = ((i % 2) == 0);
share|improve this answer
2  
What? That's not C#! That's pure C! :-P –  asterite Oct 2 '08 at 16:09
7  
I'll throw a WinForm around it to make it pure C#... –  Michael Petrotta Oct 2 '08 at 16:21
4  
bool in pure C? –  mateusza Jun 18 '09 at 20:15
1  
@mateusza @David Thornley In C99 bool is a standard feature (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stdbool.h) –  fortran Sep 1 '10 at 16:23
1  
Talk about hugely redundant parentheses... –  Thomas Eding Apr 27 '12 at 19:59

I would build a table of the parities (0 if even 1 if odd) of the integers (so one could do a lookup :D), but gcc won't let me make arrays of such sizes:

typedef unsigned int uint;

char parity_uint [UINT_MAX];
char parity_sint_shifted [((uint) INT_MAX) + ((uint) abs (INT_MIN))];
char* parity_sint = parity_sint_shifted - INT_MIN;

void build_parity_tables () {
    char parity = 0;
    unsigned int ui;
    for (ui = 1; ui <= UINT_MAX; ++ui) {
        parity_uint [ui - 1] = parity;
        parity = !parity;
    }
    parity = 0;
    int si;
    for (si = 1; si <= INT_MAX; ++si) {
        parity_sint [si - 1] = parity;
        parity = !parity;
    }
    parity = 1;
    for (si = -1; si >= INT_MIN; --si) {
        parity_sint [si] = parity;
        parity = !parity;
    }
}

char uparity (unsigned int n) {
    if (n == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    return parity_uint [n - 1];
}

char sparity (int n) {
    if (n == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (n < 0) {
        ++n;
    }
    return parity_sint [n - 1];
}

So let's instead resort to the mathematical definition of even and odd instead.

An integer n is even if there exists an integer k such that n = 2k.

An integer n is odd if there exists an integer k such that n = 2k + 1.

Here's the code for it:

char even (int n) {
    int k;
    for (k = INT_MIN; k <= INT_MAX; ++k) {
        if (n == 2 * k) {
            return 1;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

char odd (int n) {
    int k;
    for (k = INT_MIN; k <= INT_MAX; ++k) {
        if (n == 2 * k + 1) {
            return 1;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

Let C-integers denote the possible values of int in a given C compilation. (Note that C-integers is a subset of the integers.)

Now one might worry that for a given n in C-integers that the corresponding integer k might not exist within C-integers. But with a little proof it is can be shown that for all integers n, |n| <= |2n| (*), where |n| is "n if n is positive and -n otherwise". In other words, for all n in integers at least one of the following holds (exactly either cases (1 and 2) or cases (3 and 4) in fact but I won't prove it here):

Case 1: n <= 2n.

Case 2: -n <= -2n.

Case 3: -n <= 2n.

Case 4: n <= -2n.

Now take 2k = n. (Such a k does exist if n is even, but I won't prove it here. If n is not even then the loop in even fails to return early anyway, so it doesn't matter.) But this implies k < n if n not 0 by (*) and the fact (again not proven here) that for all m, z in integers 2m = z implies z not equal to m given m is not 0. In the case n is 0, 2*0 = 0 so 0 is even we are done (if n = 0 then 0 is in C-integers because n is in C-integer in the function even, hence k = 0 is in C-integers). Thus such a k in C-integers exists for n in C-integers if n is even.

A similar argument shows that if n is odd, there exists a k in C-integers such that n = 2k + 1.

Hence the functions even and odd presented here will work properly for all C-integers.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't mean offense, but what's the point of this answer? i % 2 is much smaller and probably more efficient. –  GManNickG Feb 27 '10 at 2:32
1  
@GMan: But this is way more deterministic! This will work correctly detect all edge cases. –  P Daddy Feb 27 '10 at 2:56
    
... AND (!!!) it is correct!!! –  Thomas Eding Feb 27 '10 at 3:48
    
I can't tell if you're joking or not. :X %2 works for all integers. –  GManNickG Feb 27 '10 at 16:38
    
+1: I was gonna say "Good Answer", but I think "Interesting Answer" is more appropriate. –  James Webster May 23 '12 at 0:29
i % 2 == 0
share|improve this answer

Reading this rather entertaining discussion, I remembered that I had a real-world, time-sensitive function that tested for odd and even numbers inside the main loop. It's an integer power function, posted elsewhere on StackOverflow, as follows. The benchmarks were quite surprising. At least in this real-world function, modulo is slower, and significantly so. The winner, by a wide margin is an or ( | ) approach, and is nowhere to be found elsewhere on this page.

static dbl  IntPow(dbl st0, int x)  {
    UINT OrMask = UINT_MAX -1;
    dbl  st1=1.0;
    if(0==x) return (dbl)1.0;

    while(1 != x)   {
        if (UINT_MAX == (x|OrMask)) {     //  if LSB is 1...    
        //if(x & 1) {
        //if(x % 2) {
            st1 *= st0;
        }    
        x = x >> 1;  // shift x right 1 bit...  
        st0 *= st0;
    }
    return st1 * st0;
}

For 300 million loops, the benchmark timings are as follows.

3.962 the | and mask approach

4.851 the & approach

5.850 the % approach

For people who think theory, or an assembly language listing, settles arguments like these, this should be a cautionary tale. There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

share|improve this answer

I know this is just syntactic sugar and only applicable in .net but what about extension method...

public static class RudiGroblerExtensions
{
    public static bool IsOdd(this int i)
    {
        return ((i % 2) != 0);
    }
}

Now you can do the following

int i = 5;
if (i.IsOdd())
{
    // Do something...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice code. Pity that it will claim that 2 is odd, and 3 is not. –  Anthony Oct 2 '08 at 11:42
    
oops, sorry... my logic is wrong way round... –  rudigrobler Oct 2 '08 at 13:00

In the "creative but confusing category" I offer:

int isOdd(int n) { return n ^ n * n ? isOdd(n * n) : n; }

A variant on this theme that is specific to Microsoft C++:

__declspec(naked) bool __fastcall isOdd(const int x)
{
	__asm
	{
		mov eax,ecx
		mul eax
		mul eax
		mul eax
		mul eax
		mul eax
		mul eax
		ret
	}
}
share|improve this answer

Here is an answer in Java:

public static boolean isEven (Integer Number) {
    Pattern number = Pattern.compile("^.*?(?:[02]|8|(?:6|4))$");
    String num = Number.toString(Number);
    Boolean numbr = new Boolean(number.matcher(num).matches());
    return numbr.booleanValue();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see a pattern...! ;) –  Marcus Fritzsch Jul 20 '12 at 9:18

The bitwise method depends on the inner representation of the integer. Modulo will work anywhere there is a modulo operator. For example, some systems actually use the low level bits for tagging (like dynamic languages), so the raw x & 1 won't actually work in that case.

share|improve this answer

IsOdd(int x) { return true; }

Proof of correctness - consider the set of all positive integers and suppose there is a non-empty set of integers that are not odd. Because positive integers are well-ordered, there will be a smallest not odd number, which in itself is pretty odd, so clearly that number can't be in the set. Therefore this set cannot be non-empty. Repeat for negative integers except look for the greatest not odd number.

share|improve this answer

Portable:

i % 2 ? odd : even;

Unportable:

i & 1 ? odd : even;

i << (BITS_PER_INT - 1) ? odd : even;
share|improve this answer

As some people have posted, there are numerous ways to do this. According to this website, the fastest way is the modulus operator:

if (x % 2 == 0)
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

However, here is some other code that was bench marked by the author which ran slower than the common modulus operation above:

if ((x & 1) == 0)
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

System.Math.DivRem((long)x, (long)2, out outvalue);
        if ( outvalue == 0)
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

if (((x / 2) * 2) == x)
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

if (((x >> 1) << 1) == x)
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

        while (index > 1)
               index -= 2;
        if (index == 0)
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

tempstr = x.ToString();
        index = tempstr.Length - 1;
        //this assumes base 10
        if (tempstr[index] == '0' || tempstr[index] == '2' || tempstr[index] == '4' || tempstr[index] == '6' || tempstr[index] == '8')
               total += 1; //even number
        else
               total -= 1; //odd number

How many people even knew of the Math.System.DivRem method or why would they use it??

share|improve this answer

For the sake of discussion...

You only need to look at the last digit in any given number to see if it is even or odd. Signed, unsigned, positive, negative - they are all the same with regards to this. So this should work all round: -

void tellMeIfItIsAnOddNumberPlease(int iToTest){
  int iLastDigit;
  iLastDigit = iToTest - (iToTest / 10 * 10);
  if (iLastDigit % 2 == 0){
    printf("The number %d is even!\n", iToTest);
  } else {
    printf("The number %d is odd!\n", iToTest);
  }
}

The key here is in the third line of code, the division operator performs an integer division, so that result are missing the fraction part of the result. So for example 222 / 10 will give 22 as a result. Then multiply it again with 10 and you have 220. Subtract that from the original 222 and you end up with 2, which by magic is the same number as the last digit in the original number. ;-) The parenthesis are there to remind us of the order the calculation is done in. First do the division and the multiplication, then subtract the result from the original number. We could leave them out, since the priority is higher for division and multiplication than of subtraction, but this gives us "more readable" code.

We could make it all completely unreadable if we wanted to. It would make no difference whatsoever for a modern compiler: -

printf("%d%s\n",iToTest,0==(iToTest-iToTest/10*10)%2?" is even":" is odd");

But it would make the code way harder to maintain in the future. Just imagine that you would like to change the text for odd numbers to "is not even". Then someone else later on want to find out what changes you made and perform a svn diff or similar...

If you are not worried about portability but more about speed, you could have a look at the least significant bit. If that bit is set to 1 it is an odd number, if it is 0 it's an even number. On a little endian system, like Intel's x86 architecture it would be something like this: -

if (iToTest & 1) {
  // Even
} else {
  // Odd
}
share|improve this answer
    
What exactly is wrong with just going iToTest%2==0? You are wasting a division extracting the last digit, so yours is twice as slow as it needs to be. –  freespace Oct 3 '08 at 12:07
    
@freespace: I waste more than that, don't I? :-) A multiplication and a subtraction too. But what is most efficient between the two solutions I don't dare to say. Never claimed this to be the fastest solution, quite the opposite if you read the first line of my post again. –  Tooony Oct 3 '08 at 13:06
    
@Tooony, ah, my humour hat fell off. It is formly back on now :D Sorry about that :) –  freespace Oct 4 '08 at 4:10

If you want to be efficient, use bitwise operators (x & 1), but if you want to be readable use modulo 2 (x % 2)

share|improve this answer
    
-1: If you want to be efficient, use either one. If you want it to be portable, use %. If you want it to be readable, use %. Hmmm, I see a pattern here. –  Thomas Eding Apr 27 '12 at 20:25
    
@trinithis, there is no pattern and this solution much much better than yours. –  Subs May 19 '12 at 5:44
int isOdd(int i){
  return(i % 2);
}

done.

share|improve this answer
    
Your joke gives the wrong answer. –  Thomas Eding Apr 27 '12 at 20:18

To give more elaboration on the bitwise operator method for those of us who didn't do much boolean algebra during our studies, here is an explanation. Probably not of much use to the OP, but I felt like making it clear why NUMBER & 1 works.

Please note like as someone answered above, the way negative numbers are represented can stop this method working. In fact it can even break the modulo operator method too since each language can differ in how it deals with negative operands.

However if you know that NUMBER will always be positive, this works well.

As Tooony above made the point that only the last digit in binary (and denary) is important.

A boolean logic AND gate dictates that both inputs have to be a 1 (or high voltage) for 1 to be returned.

1 & 0 = 0.

0 & 1 = 0.

0 & 0 = 0.

1 & 1 = 1.

If you represent any number as binary (I have used an 8 bit representation here), odd numbers have 1 at the end, even numbers have 0.

For example:

1 = 00000001

2 = 00000010

3 = 00000011

4 = 00000100

If you take any number and use bitwise AND (& in java) it by 1 it will either return 00000001, = 1 meaning the number is odd. Or 00000000 = 0, meaning the number is even.

E.g

Is odd?

1 & 1 =

00000001 &

00000001 =

00000001 <— Odd

2 & 1 =

00000010 &

00000001 =

00000000 <— Even

54 & 1 =

00000001 &

00110110 =

00000000 <— Even

This is why this works:

if(number & 1){

   //Number is odd

} else {

   //Number is even
}

Sorry if this is redundant.

share|improve this answer

Try this: return (((a>>1)<<1) == a)

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Oct 19 '11 at 22:54

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.