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Notice how in this code, the double quadratic(); at the top doesn't match the **double quadratic(double a, double b, double c) in the definition below main.

Yet oddly, this compiles! I'm using gcc -ansi -Wall -pedantic weird.c and no matter what flags I use, it still works.

This goes against what I've been taught. Why does this compile and work properly?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
double inputValues();
double quadratic();

int main()
{
        inputValues();
        inputValues();
        inputValues();
        return 0;
}

double inputValues()
{
        double a, b, c,derp;

        printf("Enter a value a: ");
        scanf("%lf", &a);

        printf("Enter a value b: ");
        scanf("%lf", &b);

        printf("Enter a value c: ");
        scanf("%lf", &c);

        derp = quadratic(a, b, c);

        printf("One x-value for this equation is %0.3f: \n", derp);
        return 0;
}

double quadratic(double a, double b, double c)
{
        double quad;

        quad = (-b + sqrt(b*b-4*a*c))/(2*a);
        return quad;
}
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3  
In C, double inputValues(); is not a prototype: it is a (tentative) declaration. To be a prototype it would have to be double inputValues(void); or something else with specific parameters. A declaration is weaker than a prototype. –  pmg Apr 18 '13 at 21:06
1  
"This goes against what I've been taught." -- If you were explicitly taught that this would fail then you were taught wrong. More likely your teaching was simply incomplete and omitted obsolescent constructs. –  Jim Balter Apr 18 '13 at 21:27
    
pmg's comment is better (in being accurate) than any of the answers to date. –  Jim Balter Apr 18 '13 at 21:30
    
Add the -Wstrict-prototypes option to gcc C builds to get warnings when a function is being used without a proper prototype. –  Michael Burr Apr 18 '13 at 22:06

4 Answers 4

double quadratic();

declares a function that returns a double with an unspecified (but fixed) number of parameters.

It matches with the prototype of your function:

double quadratic(double a, double b, double c)
{
   /* ... */
}

This is not equivalent to:

double quadratic(void);

which is a declaration in the prototype form of a function that returns a double with no parameter.

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One comment: a function declaration with an empty argument list doesn't mean that there's a fixed number of parameters - it says that there's no information about the parameters. It may still be a vararg function. From C99 (similar for C90): "The empty list in a function declarator that is not part of a definition of that function specifies that no information about the number or types of the parameters is supplied". –  Michael Burr Apr 18 '13 at 22:03
    
@MichaelBurr the number of arguments has to be fixed and cannot be variable because of this paragraph in C99: (c99, 6.9.1p8) "If a function that accepts a variable number of arguments is defined without a parameter type list that ends with the ellipsis notation, the behavior is undefined." –  ouah Apr 18 '13 at 22:19
    
that applies to the definition, not a simple declaration. –  Michael Burr Apr 18 '13 at 22:20
    
@MichaelBurr So let's use this one: (6.7.5p15) "If one type has a parameter type list and the other type is specified by a function definition that contains a (possibly empty) identifier list, both shall agree in the number of parameters, and the type of each prototype parameter shall be compatible with the type that results from the application of the default argument promotions to the type of the corresponding identifier." –  ouah Apr 18 '13 at 22:35
    
@MichaelBurr And the Rationale says this "The Standard requires that calls to functions taking a variable number of arguments must occur in the presence of a prototype using the trailing ellipsis notation , (...). An implementation may thus assume that all other functions are called with a fixed argument list, and may therefore use possibly more efficient calling sequences. Programs using old-style headers in which the number of arguments in the calls and the definition differ may not work in implementations which take advantage of such optimizations." –  ouah Apr 18 '13 at 22:35

If you omit the parameter list, the compiler assumes that the function exists, but do not check if parameters match.

Your code would not compile if you had declared double quadratic(void); because their, the signatures would be complete and would not match.

C standard, Committee Draft — April 12, 2011, §6.7.6.3.15

For two function types to be compatible, both shall specify compatible return types. Moreover, the parameter type lists, if both are present, shall agree in the number of parameters and in use of the ellipsis terminator; corresponding parameters shall have compatible types. If one type has a parameter type list and the other type is specified by a function declarator that is not part of a function definition and that contains an empty identifier list, the parameter list shall not have an ellipsis terminator and the type of each parameter shall be compatible with the type that results from the application of the default argument promotions.

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Can you find a reference for this in some C standard? –  Jonathan Ben-Avraham Apr 18 '13 at 21:17
    
@JonathanBen-Avraham I updated my answer with a quote from the standard –  tomahh Apr 19 '13 at 8:55
    
+1. Arghhh! Someone should translate that into English. –  Jonathan Ben-Avraham Apr 19 '13 at 9:17

Originally in C there were no prototypes; there were simply function declarations, and those declarations did not include the parameter list. Later when prototypes were added, the old form of declaration had to be retained for backward compatibility.

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In C an empty argument list in a function declaration means that the function takes an undefined number of parameters. That's why the C compiler doesn't complain. The same code would be an error in C++ because an empty parameter list in the declaration means that the function takes no arguments.

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That's why the C compiler doesn't complain. You should either omit the mention of C++ or mention that this is an error in C++. –  Jim Balter Apr 18 '13 at 21:29
    
@JimBalter OK, I clarified my answer. –  Daniel Martín Apr 18 '13 at 21:36

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