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the syntax:

 using namespace x;

tells the compiler to find the symbols from namespace x. The situation becomes bad once you have a same symbol in two namespaces and you want to mutually use them. Is there a way to tell the compiler not to use a namespace? What I mean is something like this (namespaces x and y both have the function a)

using namespace x;
int k = a(); //x::a is called
drop namespace x; //imaginary syntax that I am looking for
using namespace y;
int j = a(); //y::a is called

"You must use scope resolution symbol '::'" is not the answer I am looking for.

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16  
why don't you wanna use scope resolution ?? –  jsedano Apr 18 '13 at 21:17
7  
"Doctor, doctor, it hurts when I do this!" –  Pete Becker Apr 18 '13 at 21:22
9  
Don't use using namespace in the first place. –  Cat Plus Plus Apr 18 '13 at 21:22
11  
Indeed, but I wondered if you simply missed the point. –  Etienne de Martel Apr 18 '13 at 21:33
5  
Nitpick: you can't not use scope resolution. Without resolution, everything is unresolved by definition, and no program will ever get linked. What you meant (I think) is I don't want to do explicit namespace qualification on identifier use. –  sehe Apr 18 '13 at 22:03
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3 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Since you don't want to use scope resolution, then create some additional scope:

{
    using namespace x;
    int k = a(); //x::a is called
}
{
    using namespace y;
    int j = a(); //y::a is called
}

I'm afraid this might turn to be worse than scope resolution, though :/

Edit:

One more thing (which I don't know if you're aware of) that might be helpful are namespace aliases. Say you've got a namespace with a disgustingly long name or multiple nested namespaces. You can shorten the name such as:

namespace x = very::weird::namespc::name;
namespace y = yabadabadoopdiedoo;
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2  
Glad it helped, just don't blame me if your coworkers diss you for it ;) –  jrok Apr 18 '13 at 21:27
3  
OP mush hate Krillin. Anyway, just an advice. If you're programming in C++, program in C++. I would hate to be the person to maintain your code. –  ArgumentNullException Apr 18 '13 at 21:37
9  
@GreenCode No, omitting them makes it complicated. –  Cat Plus Plus Apr 18 '13 at 21:49
7  
@GreenCode This is not your personal helpdesk and answers encouraging to solve this ~~problem~~ in this particular way are actively harmful to people who'll stumble upon this question later. Your English words are quite irrelevant, because it's just a sign of XY problem (i.e. you invented a solution and want to know how to implement it, but it's not the right solution in the first place). –  Cat Plus Plus Apr 18 '13 at 22:01
3  
@CatPlusPlus: I didn't mean any harm to any persons knowledge and I am very sorry if I showed disrespect to anyone. I only wanted to ask if this is possible in C++. The question had a right answer in my opinion and it is the one I chose. Again, I am very sorry for my bad manners, but please understand that in my question body, I mentioned that using scope resolution is not what I am looking for. –  A2B Apr 18 '13 at 22:07
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You cannot "drop" a namespace, however, when using namespace composition you can resolve specific ambiguities as follows:

namespace composite {
    using namespace x;
    using namespace y;
    using y::a; // use y::a in case of ambiguity

    void foo() {
        a(); // calls y::a
    }
}
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That doesn't work. –  jrok Apr 18 '13 at 21:40
    
@jrok It works for me. –  StackedCrooked Apr 18 '13 at 21:42
1  
You need to reduce the scope of the last using statement. Example. Or, even better, reduce the scope of all using directive.. –  StackedCrooked Apr 18 '13 at 21:51
1  
IIRC it only doesn't work in the global namespace. (This feature is called 'namespace composition btw. So it makes sense..) –  StackedCrooked Apr 18 '13 at 21:55
1  
Adding using y::a after using namespace a adds nothing, AFAIK. It just inserts the name a into the enclosing namespace, which has already happened. –  sehe Apr 18 '13 at 22:25
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2 A using-directive specifies that the names in the nominated namespace can be used in the scope in which the using-directive appears after the using-directive. During unqualified name lookup (3.4.1), the names appear as if they were declared in the nearest enclosing namespace which contains both the using-directive and the nominated namespace. [ Note: In this context, “contains” means “contains directly or indirectly”. —end note ]

Thus you have to use different scopes. There is no way to unuse, after using.

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