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Can I use jquery done() on "non-ajax" functions. I get the error Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'done' of undefined when I try to do something like this.

function countThreeSeconds() {
    var counter = 0,
    timer = setInterval(function () {

        if (counter == 3) {
            console.log("All done. That was three seconds.");
            window.clearInterval(timer);

        } else {
          console.log("Not there yet. Counter at: " + counter);
        }
        counter++;
    }, 1000);

}

(function(){
  var timer = countThreeSeconds().done(function(){
     alert("done");
  });

}());

Thanks

JSBIN

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3  
As you can see, you can't. jQuery has nothing to do with it. You can never call a method on undefined. jQuery methods don't just magically appear everywhere (thank goodness). You can call them on specific objects defined in the jQuery library and as described by jQuery's API. –  squint Apr 18 '13 at 21:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Make the non-ajax function return a promise object.

function countThreeSeconds() {
    var counter = 0,
    deferred = $.Deferred(),
    timer = setInterval(function () {

        if (counter == 3) {
            console.log("All done. That was three seconds.");
            window.clearInterval(timer);
            deferred.resolve();

        } else {              
            console.log("Not there yet. Counter at: " + counter);
            deferred.notify(counter);
        }
        counter++;
    }, 1000);
    return deferred.promise();

}

(function(){
  var timer = countThreeSeconds().done(function(){
     alert("done");
  }).progress(function(i){
     console.log("in progress...",i);
  });

}());
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This is really nice. And makes perfect sense. So obvious now that I couldn't expect a normal function to automatically have access to all those deferred methods like jquery ajax. Thanks much! –  thomas Apr 18 '13 at 21:43
    
how does the comma in the last console work? I've not seen that before.. –  thomas Apr 18 '13 at 21:59
    
console.log() accepts an infinite( i think? ) number of arguments, it just allows you to log more than one thing, or label each log so that you know what it is. –  Kevin B Apr 18 '13 at 22:02
    
huh. Cool. Thanks again. –  thomas Apr 18 '13 at 22:08

Since you're not returning anything from the function, it's perfectly valid JS behavior. To be able to use done on the function, return jQuery.Deferred object from it.

Something like this:

function countThreeSeconds() {
    var defer = $.Deferred(function() { // do your stuff here });
    return defer.promise();
}
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Why are you passing a function to $.Deferred? That's not where your code goes. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 18 '13 at 21:38
    
@RocketHazmat There's nothing wrong with doing it in the function. pastebin.com/CWXWcmkS –  Kevin B Apr 18 '13 at 21:44
    
@KevinB: I just looked at the docs. Guess you're right, but I've never seen it done that way. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 18 '13 at 21:45
    
@KevinB: Whoah! I like that syntax. :-) –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 18 '13 at 21:46
    
@RocketHazmat Me too. It's just usually easier to sprinkle it into existing code using the syntax i used in my answer. –  Kevin B Apr 18 '13 at 21:47

Thomas, with something like this, you could make a Deferred object (and its promise) really work for you.

For example, you could make countThreeSeconds() a raw, more generalized function, and have all progress/done reporting performed in the calling function.

function countSeconds(n) {
    var dfrd = $.Deferred(),
        counter = 0,
        timer = setInterval(function() {
            counter++;
            if (counter < n) { dfrd.notify(counter); }
            else { dfrd.resolve(); }
        }, 1000);
    return {
        promise: dfrd.promise(),
        timer: timer
    };
}

(function() {
    var timerObj = countSeconds(3);
    timerObj.promise.progress(function(counter) {
        console.log("Not there yet. Counter at: " + counter);
    }).done(function() {
        clearInterval(timerObj.timer);
        console.log("All done. That was three seconds.");
        alert("done");
    });
}());

Thus, another function could call countSeconds() with a different value, and handle progress and done situations differently.

For example :

(function() {
    var timerObj = countSeconds(10);
    timerObj.promise.progress(function(counter) {
        $("#message").text("Counter = " + counter);
    }).done(function() {
        clearInterval(timerObj.timer);
        $("#message").text('Complete');
    });
}());
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