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i try to cast a reference of int8_t to a reference of uint8_t.

i have the following code:

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, uint8_t& va) {
  // do something
  // ...

  return mt;
}

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, int8_t& va) {
  // do the same but signed
  // ...

  return mt;
}

since both overloads doing the same, i want to dry (or better drm), so i would like to call the first operator with casted va. but how do i do that? this won't work.

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, int8_t& va) {
  return mt& static_cast<uint8_t>(va); //  error: no match for 'operator&' in 'mt & (uint8_t)va'
}

how do i do that right?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You want to reinterpret what the data is.

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, int8_t& va) {
  return mt& reinterpret_cast<uint8_t&>(va);
}

Be careful though. Depending on what "do the same but signed" means, you may not be doing The Right Thing by calling the same function and assuming the data is always unsigned.

If your code is doing work that has unique signed/unsigned logic (despite the code looking the same) you'll want to use a template function to generate the correct type-specific logic.

template< Typename T >
mtype& do_the_work( mtype& mt, T& va )
{
  // do something

  // (Here's an example of code that LOOKS the same, but doesn't DO the same)
  va = va >> 1;
}

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, uint8_t& va) {
  return do_the_work( mt, va );
}

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, int8_t& va) {
  return do_the_work( mt, va );
}
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You should probably pedantically observe that on a hypothetical system where these types are not just typedef to char types, the reinterpret_cast would violate the strict alias rules. –  Mark B Apr 18 '13 at 22:00
inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, int8_t& va) {
  return mt & reinterpret_cast<uint8_t&>(va);
}
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The error you get is because the cast results in a value not a reference.

You should use:

reinterpret_cast<uint8_t&>(va)
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@MikeSeymour Right, my mistake. –  syam Apr 18 '13 at 21:50

Your problem is that you're casting to a non-const value but your functions expect non-const references.

Almost certainly what you really want is for the operators to accept the second parameter by value (and if your operator& really does mutate its right hand operator you need to rethink your operator):

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, uint8_t va) {
  // do something
  // ...

  return mt;
}

inline mtype& operator&(mtype& mt, int8_t va) {
  return mt& static_cast<uint8_t>(va); //  error: no match for 'operator&' in 'so & (uint8_t)va'
}
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