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I have a javascript object which I would like to be able to handle some interactive features. It's a bit tricky to describe the scenario in a simple way so hopefully it'll not get all out of hand here.

my object looks something like

myobject = function() {
    this.initialize = function() {
        // HERE this = the myobject instance
        var test = document.createElement('div');
        test.onmousedown = this.mousedown;
    }
    this.mousedown = function(e) {
        // HERE this = the calling div-element
    }
}

So my problem is basically that this will not be an myobject instance when this.mousedown(e) is called, it will rather be the caller (if the terminology is correct?) in this case it is the div I created and put in a variable called test above.

I would like to have access to the instance on which the method is being run (as I believe that to be the mousedown method I created).

This far I have had some ideas which I have tried out:

  • create a data- attribute on the div containing the this object and operate on that.
  • sending the this pointer as an argument along with e to this.mousedown(e)

It's all I can think of now hope it makes sence.

share|improve this question
4  
Are you aware that your sample code is invalid JS? funciton () { ... } is a method call to a function named "funciton" followed by an unrelated block of statements. this.initialize() { ... } is similarly a method call followed by an unrelated block. as is this.mousedown() { ... }. Post semicolon insertion, this code is equivalent to myobject = funciton(); this.initialize(); var test = ...; test.onmousedown = this.mousedown; this.mousedown(); – Mike Samuel Apr 18 '13 at 21:59
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could create a copy when you first instantiate the object:

var myobject = function() {
    var self = this;    
    this.initialize() {
        // HERE this = the myobject instance
        var test = document.createElement('div');
        test.onmousedown = this.mousedown;
    }
    this.mousedown(e) {
        // HERE this = the calling div-element
        // use self instead of this
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? this is a valid solution – Kenneth Apr 18 '13 at 21:58
    
lazy cowards?... oh well. – Tom Carchrae Apr 18 '13 at 22:01
    
@Kenneth that does solve my problem as far as I can see, I think most of all I were a bit confused when trying to use this in the call-back functions and when I looked inside to see why it weren't working I realized that this in the context weren't the js-object at all. But the solution you prompted works fine for me thanks! – qrikko Apr 18 '13 at 22:05
    
Perfect! Happy to help. I imagine the errors in your script come from copying the code to SO. If not, please revise Mike's comment – Kenneth Apr 18 '13 at 22:07
    
Indeed the problems were because I wrote the example just from the top of my head and weren't careful to type a working example. I think I've edited it and that it should be correct now as long as I didn't missinterpret the comment about what was wrong. – qrikko Apr 18 '13 at 22:16

The simplest solution is to make a 'self' var that you refer to in the callback:

myobject = funciton() {
    var self = this;
    this.initialize() {
        //use self to refer to myobject
        self.mousedown(e);
    }
    this.mousedown(e) {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i'll admit i've no idea what you're trying to do with .mousedown - but as @Kenneth also pointed out, this how you can avoid 'this' confusion. – Tom Carchrae Apr 18 '13 at 22:02
    
funciton() should be function() I believe – lifetimes Apr 18 '13 at 22:05
    
for sure... i copied the code and gave an example of how to use 'self' – Tom Carchrae Apr 19 '13 at 0:51

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