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When not using ARC, you get a warning when not calling [super dealloc] in your dealloc method.

I'm trying to implement something similar with a class that gets subclassed often to warn the person implementing the subclass when they don't call super.

Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Recent versions of llvm have added an attribute that indicates that subclasses must call super:

@interface Barn:NSObject
- (void)openDoor __attribute__((objc_requires_super));
@end

@implementation Barn
- (void) openDoor
{
    ;
}
@end

@interface HorseBarn:Barn
@end
@implementation HorseBarn
- (void) openDoor
{
    ;
}
@end

Compiling the above produces the warning:

Method possibly missing a [super openDoor] call
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2  
Neat. This works in Xcode 4.6.2 (maybe earlier). –  rob mayoff Apr 18 '13 at 23:02
    
Works as described! Thanks! –  jordanperry Apr 19 '13 at 14:53
    
Pretty cool have just been looking at this on merowing.info/2014/02/ios-tips However I wonder why Apple don't use it themselves for viewDidAppear etc. –  Max MacLeod Feb 27 at 14:32
1  
@MaxMacLeod Time; while adding the declaration itself isn't that hard, it likely has fallout across quite a bit of the codebase. It takes time to embrace language features across such a large codebase. –  bbum Feb 27 at 18:05
    
@bbum fair point. I'd guess then they'll implement it internally and eventually roll it out in an SDK update. –  Max MacLeod Feb 28 at 8:14

UPDATE

See bbum's answer for a direct way to tell the compiler that subclassers must call super.

ORIGINAL

What Apple does generally is to provide a hook, like viewDidLoad. Apple doesn't do any work in the base -[UIViewController viewDidLoad]. It's an empty method. Instead, Apple does its work elsewhere, in some private method that you're not allowed to override, and calls your viewDidLoad from that method. So even if you forget to call [super viewDidLoad] in your UIViewController subclass, all of Apple's work still gets done.

Perhaps you can revise your API to use a similar pattern.

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1  
Your comments after the primary answer make assumptions about Apple's opaque implementation that may not be valid and are definitely not true for other examples. Generally, when overriding a framework method you should always call the super implementation unless it is documented otherwise (as with loadView for a UIViewController). –  XJones Apr 18 '13 at 22:59
    
Of course we shouldn't rely on undocumented implementation details, and I did not suggest that we should. I pointed out a pattern that Apple uses to reduce the damage when super isn't called. (I am not making assumptions about whether Apple uses the pattern. I have verified it with testing and disassembly on several versions of iOS. Of course they may stop using it in some future version.) –  rob mayoff Apr 18 '13 at 23:02
    
Your original answer did mention a compiler warning. I understand your intent but the pattern you mention doesn't exist. You are implying that Apple's implementation is that if a required method is overridden without calling super, the framework can handle it. There are plenty of examples where things will break if you don't call the super implementation. It is true that in the specific case of viewDidLoad you don't have to call [super viewDidLoad] for a UIViewController subclass. I would call super anyway as that is a good habit to be in. –  XJones Apr 18 '13 at 23:07
    
My answer never mentioned a compiler warning. I was not aware of any relevant compiler warning until I read bbum's answer, which was posted 21 minutes after my answer. –  rob mayoff Apr 18 '13 at 23:17
    
hey, not trying to argue with you on what your answer was. I was simply referring to your initial direct answer that it was not possible to generate a compiler warning when super isn't called for a custom method. not really relevant to my main point. and btw, I'm only trying to clarify something I felt was misleading but in general, great work helping people out on SO. –  XJones Apr 18 '13 at 23:20

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