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I know that similar topics have been covered here, but I am running into a problem that I think arises from my misunderstanding how array slices are interpolated in the context of a foreach loop. I can't figure out where I've gone wrong, so I'm looking for some insight.

I have a 2D array with a variable number of rows. For example purposes:

@2DArray = (['str1', 1, 2, 'E', val1, val2, val3]
            ['str2', 3, 4, 'E', val4, val5, val6]
            ['str4', 5, 6, 'F', val7, val8, val9])   

I want to build a new array, with additional columns, that incorporates some of the rows of the original array only if they contain the string 'E' in column 3. Additionally, for the rows I do wish to incorporate in my new array, I only want a subset of the columns and I want that subset in a different order. The end goal is to generate output of the correct format required by downstream scripts.

Here is my attempt to do that:

my $projName = 'test';

my $i = 1;
my @Newarray
my @Newarray_element;
     foreach (@2DArray) {
         if  (${$_}[3] eq 'E') {
             ${$_}[3] = $i; 
             ${$_}[5] = '+'; 
             @Newarray_element = ("$projName$i", @$_[0,1,2,5,3], 'STR', 11, 11);
             $i++;
             push (@Newarray, \@Newarray_element);
         }

         next;
     }

print (join("\t", @$_), "\n") for @Newarray;

However, if I do that, what I get is:

#(original) col nums:      0       1    2    5    3

                  test2    str2    3    4    +    2    STR    11    11
                  test2    str2    3    4    +    2    STR    11    11

I.e., my new array will have a row for every row in the original array with an 'E' in column 3, but each row is populated with the values from the last row to be processed by the loop.

The reason I think the issue has to do with slicing a 2D array in a foreach loop is that I know if I merely loop through a 2D array, find all the rows with an 'E' in column 3, modify some values in other columns for those rows, and then return that to a new array it all works perfectly. That is to say, if I instead do this:

my @Newarray;
my $i = 1;
foreach (@2Darray) {
    if  (${$_}[3] eq "E") {
        ${$_}[3] = $i;
        ${$_}[5] = '+';
        $i++;
        push (@Newarray, \@$_);
    }
    next;   
}
print (join("\t", @$_), "\n") for @Newarray;

I get exactly the output I would expect:

                  *            &
str1    1    2    1    val1    +    val3
str2    3    4    2    val4    +    val6

where the columns marked by * and & are the modified columns 3 and 5. Let the onslaught begin: where did my newbie self go wrong?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The variable @Newarray_element points to the same memory space throughout your program, so changes you make in one iteration are propagated to previous iterations where you used that variable in an assignment.

Two possible fixes:

One. Change the scope of the variable so that it uses different memory in each iteration. Change

my @Newarray_element;
foreach (@2DArray) {
    ...

to

foreach (@2DArray) {
    my @Newarray_element;
    ...

or even

foreach (@2DArray) {
    ...
    my @Newarray_element = ("$projName$i", @$_[0,1,2,5,3], 'STR', 11, 11);

Two: reuse @Newarray_element but assign a copy of its data to each row of @Newarray. Change

push (@Newarray, \@Newarray_element);

to

push (@Newarray, [ @Newarray_element ]);

This latter call creates and appends a new, anonymous array reference to @Newarray.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. A very dumb mistake, and proof that I've not yet mastered Perl references. Can you explain to me, in your second example, exactly what [@New_element] is doing? If I'm reading that correctly, does that make an anonymous array with the contents of @Newarray_element that is lost when the loop closes? –  MCor Apr 18 '13 at 23:02
1  
@MCor: Yes, [ @Newarray_element ] makes an anonymous copy of the content of @Newarray_element (and returns a reference to that copy), so that when you overwrite @Newarray_element on the next iteration of the loop, the copy will still retain the original content. (However, it would IMO be much cleaner to just create a new local array on each iteration by moving the my declaration inside the loop.) –  Ilmari Karonen Apr 19 '13 at 1:41
1  
[ ... ] makes a new anonymous array reference, which will be pushed onto @Newarray. The contents of that the array pointed to by that reference will be a copy of the stuff in @Newarray_element. Since each one is a copy, it doesn't matter if you change @Newarray_element each time through the loop. But @mob's first suggestion is the much clearer and more idiomatic way to do it. Scoping the variable to the inside of the loop creates a new \@Newarray_element each time through. –  friedo Apr 19 '13 at 1:42
    
Out of curiosity, is it not more efficient to instantiate the array only once and then subsequently copy and change its contents as needed? For my purposes computational efficiency isn't really necessary, but that's why I intuitively favored the second solution mob mentioned. –  MCor Apr 19 '13 at 17:58

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