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How can you have a class that implements Runnable and submitted to springs TaskExecutor autowired?

For example, I have a Task:

public class MyTask implements Runnable {

    @Autowired private MyRepository myRepository;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        myRepository.doSomething();
    }
}

And a service that sends a task to the spring TaskExecutor:

@Service
public class MyService {

    @Autowired private TaskExecutor taskExecutor;

    public void someMethod() {

        MyTask myTask = new MyTask();
        taskExecutor.execute(myTask);

    }

}

I know the fields aren't being autowired because MyTask is getting instantiated using new MyTask(). However, how do I get around this? Should I be getting access to Spring's ApplicationContext and create the bean through it? How would you do this in a web application environment?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are at least two good ways to do this using Spring. First, the @Configurable annotation. Using this means a dependency on AspectJ, but it will allow you to inject beans that aren't managed by Spring (i.e. you're using the new operator). This would involve annotating MyTask with @Configurable, and adding a couple of lines to your Spring configuration as mentioned in the link.

@Configurable
public class MyTask implements Runnable { ... }

@Service
public class MyService {
   @Autowired private TaskExecutor taskExecutor;

   public void someMethod() {

     // AspectJ would jump in here and inject MyTask transparently
     MyTask myTask = new MyTask();
     taskExecutor.execute(myTask);

}

}

The second approach would involve using the ServiceLocatorFactoryBean feature of Spring to create prototype beans. This is best explained in the JavaDoc, but in this circumstance you would inject a TaskFactory into your @Service annotated class, just like any other bean and then do something like so:

@Service
public class MyService {
  @Autowired private TaskExecutor taskExecutor;
  @Autowired private MyRepository myRepository;
  @Autowired private TaskFactory taskFactory;


public void someMethod() {
    MyTask myTask = taskFactory.getTask("myTask")
    taskExecutor.execute(myTask);
}

}

MyTask would already be injected with your repository, as you could configure this in your XML mapping. I use both of these approaches on a daily basis, but I tend to favor the second one as its easier to read and helps keep developers honest by ensuring that they don't do things that aren't easily testable, and frankly, its more clear to the casual observer.

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try

public class MyTask implements Runnable {
    private MyRepository myRepository;

    public MyTask(MyRepository myRepository) {
         this.myRepository = myRepository;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        myRepository.doSomething();
    }
}

@Service
public class MyService {
    @Autowired private TaskExecutor taskExecutor;
    @Autowired private MyRepository myRepository;


    public void someMethod() {
        MyTask myTask = new MyTask(myRepository);
        taskExecutor.execute(myTask);
    }
}

or you can declare MyTask's scope = "prototype" and change MyService as

@Service
public class MyService {
    @Autowired private ApplicationContext ctx;

    public void someMethod() {
        MyTask myTask = ctx.getBean(MyTask.class);
        taskExecutor.execute(myTask);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this would work. I was hoping to get the Autowiring working in the task because I have numerous dependencies and would rather not pass them all - however, looks like there may not be a way around it. –  Brian DiCasa Apr 19 '13 at 0:13
    
There is another way, see update –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Apr 19 '13 at 0:32
    
@EvgeniyDorofeev how do I defined MyTask as prototype? –  Dejel May 5 at 19:19
1  
If you use Spring xml configuration then add scope="prototype" attr to MyTask bean definition –  Evgeniy Dorofeev May 6 at 0:57

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