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Is there any way to get Pattern that will be a conjunction of two another, such that any String will match it if in matches two another both?


Some math:

S — set of strings
P — set of patterns (where each pattern has one or more string representation (e.g. “[0-9]” and “\d” are the same pattern))

Sᵢ — subset of strings (Sᵢ ⊂ S) that match pᵢ pattern (where instead of i could be any index). In equation form: “Sᵢ = {s | s ∈ S, s matches pᵢ, pᵢ ∈ P}” — that meas: “Sᵢ is a set of elements that are strings and match pᵢ pattern”. Or another notation: “Sᵢ ⊂ S, ∀pᵢ ∈ P ∀s ∈ S (s matches pᵢ ≡ s ∈ Sᵢ)” — that meas: “Sᵢ is subset of strings and any string is element of Sᵢ if it matches pᵢ pattern”.

Let's define conjunction of patterns: “p₁ ∧ p₂ = p₃ ≡ S₁ ∩ S₂ = S₃” — that means: “Set of strings that match conjunction of patterns p₁ and p₂ is intersection of sets of strings that match p₁ pattern and that match p₂ pattern”.

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4  
use (?=foo)(?=bar).* – Doorknob Apr 18 '13 at 23:41
    
@Doorknob What is .* for? Will this equation be correct: Pattern.compile("(?=" + p1.pattern() + ")(?=" + p2.pattern() + ").*")? – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 19 '13 at 0:09
    
@Doorknob: The idea is good but is not correct. Check patterns a.*, .*b and string abacus. – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 19 '13 at 0:20

Assuming you want exact matches (that is, tomato does not match omat), then you need to wrap each p_i between (?=^(?: and )$), then join them.

If you want inexact matches (tomato does match omat), then you need to wrap each p_i between (?=.*?(?: and )), then join them. Note that in this case, there is the potential for catastrophic backtracking.

In both cases, you can add .* after joining if you want to eat the word (remember, lookaheads match the empty string).

Explanation

In the exact case, the outside is wrapped in a lookahead so that no characters are eaten. Inside are anchors ^ and $ (this provides the exactness) surrounding a non-capturing group. The non-capturing group is so if you have an or expression at the upper level in one of p_i, the anchors apply to the entire group rather than to the first expression.

The inexact case is exactly the same, except instead of anchoring, we eat characters until we get to the match position.

You can see a detailed example on www.debuggex.com.

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If you're just checking a match, you can eliminate the trailing .* Additionally, I'd add a starting anchor, and use lazy matching for a little efficiency uptick: ^(?=.*?(?:p1))(?=.*?(?:p2)) – FrankieTheKneeMan Apr 19 '13 at 3:16
    
It is better to use \A and \z instead of ^ and $. – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 19 '13 at 9:33
    
My final result for exact matching is \A(?=p1\z)(?=p2\z).* but backreferences within p2 should be recounted. – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 19 '13 at 9:38
    
@FrankieTheKneeMan, your pattern is incorrect. Try p1=a., p2=.b: string acb will match your pattern but shouldn't (p1∧p2=ab). – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 19 '13 at 9:49
    
@Errandir Not according to your original description of the problem, no. It's very natural to assume that, but your description was: p₁ ∧ p₂ = p₃ ≡ S₁ ∩ S₂ = S₃. "acb" matches both those regular expressions. The case you're thinking of is p1 = ^a.$, p2 = ^.b$, in which case the intersection is ^ab$, but my regular expression still works (albeit much less efficiently). – FrankieTheKneeMan Apr 19 '13 at 12:28
private static String combineRE(String p1, String p2){
    int groups1 = 0, groups2=0;
    StringBuilder newP = new StringBuilder("(?=");
    newP.append(p1);
    newP.append("$)(?=");

    Pattern capturingGroup = Pattern.compile("(?<!\\\\)(\\\\\\\\)*\\((?!\\?)");
    Matcher m = capturingGroup.matcher(p1);
    while(m.find()) groups1 ++;

    m = capturingGroup.matcher(p2);

    while(m.find()) groups2 ++;
    String new2 = p2;

    for(int i=1; i<=groups2; i++)
        new2 = new2.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)\\\\"+i, "\\\\" + (i+groups1));

    newP.append(new2);
    newP.append("$).*");
    return newP.toString();
}

This function uses the basic structure (?=p1$)(?=p2$).*, while recounting the numbered backreferences int the second pattern. It uses a regular expression to count the number of capturing group openers (unescaped (s not followed by a ?) in each pattern, then updates the backrefences in the second pattern before placing it in the resultant pattern. I've set up a testing environment with ideone: Please, add all the test cases you can think of, but I think this answers your question.

http://ideone.com/Wm8cRc

Round 2:

There's no good way to generate a Pattern that will find() a substring to match two patterns. I toyed briefly with (?=p1(?<p2)).*(?<(?=p1)p2) and other such nonsense before giving up and writing, instead, an algorithm. First, I slightly modified my CombineRE from before:

private static String combineRE(String p1, String p2, boolean anchors){
    int groups1 = 0, groups2=0;
    StringBuilder newP = new StringBuilder((anchors)?"^(?=":"(?=");
    newP.append(p1);
    if (anchors) newP.append('$');
    newP.append(")(?=");

    Pattern capturingGroup = Pattern.compile("(?<!\\\\)(\\\\\\\\)*\\((?!\\?)");
    Matcher m = capturingGroup.matcher(p1);
    while(m.find()) groups1 ++;

    m = capturingGroup.matcher(p2);

    while(m.find()) groups2 ++;
    String new2 = p2;

    for(int i=1; i<=groups2; i++)
        new2 = new2.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)\\\\"+i, "\\\\" + (i+groups1));

    newP.append(new2);
    if (anchors) newP.append('$');
    newP.append(')');
    if (anchors) newP.append(".*");
    return newP.toString();
}

You'll see that it now supports optional anchors. I used this functionality in my new function:

private static String[] findAllCombinedRE(String p1, String p2, String haystack, boolean overlap){
    ArrayList<String> toReturn = new ArrayList<String>();
    Pattern pCombo = Pattern.compile(combineRE(p1,p2, false));
    String pComboMatch = combineRE(p1,p2, true);
    Matcher m = pCombo.matcher(haystack);
    int s = 0;
    while (m.find(s)){
        String match = haystack.substring(m.start());
        s = m.start()+1;
        for (int i=match.length(); i>0; i--){
            String sMatch = match.substring(0,i);
            if (Pattern.matches(pComboMatch, sMatch)){
                toReturn.add(sMatch);
                /**
                 *  Note that at this point we can caluclute match
                 *  object like Information:
                 *  
                 *  group() = sMatch;
                 *  start() = m.start();
                 *  end() = m.start() + i;
                 *  
                 *  If it so suited us, we could pass this information
                 *  back in a wrapped object.
                 */
                if (!overlap){
                    s = m.start()+i;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return toReturn.toArray(new String[]{});
}

It uses an anchor free version of the two Regular Expressions to find all strings that might match, then chops off one letter at a time until the string matches the anchored version. It also includes a boolean to control for overlapping matches.

http://ideone.com/CBoBN5 Works pretty well.

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ideone.com/6oH3rA : find result should be acb – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 22 '13 at 10:22
1  
You really can't switch back and forth like this. First you asked for match(), now you're asking to find() the largest substring that match()es. I'm sorry, you're not going to be able to do that in a single regular expression. The best you can do is take two regular expressions, and use the second one to try to match() each one the first one find()s. – FrankieTheKneeMan Apr 22 '13 at 16:03
    
Unfortunately seems to be so. There is | logical operator but no & in regular expressions… – Timofey Gorshkov Apr 22 '13 at 20:51
    
@Errandir - Your original question having been answered (in the negative, I'm afraid), I did find a way to do it algorithmically. – FrankieTheKneeMan Apr 23 '13 at 22:54

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