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I'm working on a JS-based game where I'm tracking the scores of several users. At the end of the game, I need to declare a winner. There may be ties.

So, two examples:

player1 = 3
player2 = 5
player3 = 4

(Player 2 is the winner)

player1 = 4
player2 = 2
player3 = 4

(player 1 and 3 tie)

With only 3 players, I could probably just do this with a bunch of nested if/elses comparing each value to each other, but was wondering if there is a more elegant way to go about this...especially in situations where you may have 10 players as an example, where if/else comparisons would get unwieldy pretty fast.

One option seems to be to stick the values in an array, then sort it, but that doesn't give you the variable name--just the values. I could then do a multi-dimensional array, but then things seem to be getting messy again at that point.

share|improve this question
3  
Use the data structure called an associative array. This data structure is defined by matching keys to values, for example {"player1":3, "player2":5, "player3":4}. Alternatively, you could create a Player object that has a name and a score and make an array of these objects. –  Patashu Apr 19 '13 at 0:30
    
@amnotiam there's a lot of other logic that uses the player variables, but I imagine that could all be adapted to be applicable to an array as well. All that said, once you have the array, and pick the high score, you'd still have to associate that with a particular player, which I don't think the standard array would handle (though an associative array looks like it might do the trick) –  DA. Apr 19 '13 at 0:39
    
Yeah, I just wasn't understanding why you'd need the variable name for any sort of output. You'd need to hardcode the players into the program. Key/value pairs are the way to go if you need dynamic creation of players and their data. –  squint Apr 19 '13 at 0:43
    
yea, maybe this isn't a good question in terms of broad applicability. In my particular case, we do have hard coded players. You can have 1, 2 or 3 players and that's the only identifying information we keep about each one (other than the score). –  DA. Apr 19 '13 at 0:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no easy way to iterate through variable names like player1, player2, etc... without using eval() or requiring those variables to be global variables which is generally a bad way to go.

If they were global variables, you could use this hack, but I would suggest my second method below which stores player info as an array of objects. Here's a hack using global variables (not recommended, but a more direct answer to your question):

// these must be global variables
var score1 = 100;
var score2= 99;
var score3= 80;

function findHighScore() {

    var highestScore = score1;
    var highestScorePlayerNum = 1;
    var tempScore;

    for var (i = 2; i <= 3; i++) {
        // this works only because the score variables are global variables which
        // can be accessed as properties off the window object
        tempScore = window["score" + i];
        if (tempScore > highestScore) {
            highestScore = tempScore;
            highestScorePlayerNum = i;
        }
    }
    return {score: highestScore, playerNum: highestScorePlayerNum};
}

A much better way would involve not keeping each player's score in its own javascript variable, but rather putting it into an array of objects like this:

var playerData = [
    {name: "John", highScore: 145, lastPlayed: 23089234},
    [name: "Bill", highScore: 99, lastPlayed: 59383945}
];

Then, you can loop through the player data, find the highest score and have the name of that player too.

function findHighScore() {
    var highScoreSoFar = 0;
    var result;
    for (var i = 0; i < playerData.length; i++) {
        if (playerData[i].highScore > highScoreSoFar) {
            result = playerDatra[i];
            highScoreSoFar = playerData[i].highScore;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

var highPlayer = findHighScore();
alert("Highest scoring player is " + highPlayer.name + " with a score of " + highPlayer.highScore);

If you want to return all players tied for the highest score, you can return an array of players that had the highest score:

function findHighScore() {
    var highScoreSoFar = 0;
    var result = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < playerData.length; i++) {
        if (playerData[i].highScore > highScoreSoFar) {
            // new high score so start a new array with this player in it
            result = [playerData[i]];
            highScoreSoFar = playerData[i].highScore;
        } else if (playerData[i].highScore === highScoreSoFar) {
            // more than one player with this highScore so add this one to the array
            result.push(playerData[i]);
        }
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks nice. That said, it looks like this doesn't handle ties, either. Let me study it for a bit and see if I Can work that in. –  DA. Apr 19 '13 at 0:43
    
@jfriend00 Doesn't handle ties however. Just have an array of winners then, when p.highScore === highScoreSoFar, winners.push(p), when p.highScore > highScoreSofar, winners.length = 0, then winners.push(p). –  plalx Apr 19 '13 at 0:44
    
@DA - I didn't know what behavior you wanted for ties and you didn't specify. That can obviously be added to the algorithm as that is just part of the comparison function and what you want to return. You could return an array of players if you wanted to be able to return all players tied for the highest score. –  jfriend00 Apr 19 '13 at 0:44
    
@jfriend00 yes, thanks. That's just what I was thinking as well (pushing to an array when ==). –  DA. Apr 19 '13 at 0:45
1  
@DA. - I added a version that returns all players with the highest score (for ties). –  jfriend00 Apr 19 '13 at 0:49
var players = {
    player1: 3,
    player2: 5,
    player3: 4
};

var sorted = Object.keys(players)
                   .sort(function(keya, keyb) {
                       return players[keyb] - players[keya];
                   })
                   .forEach(function(key) {
                       console.log(key, players[key]);
                   })

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/WUAhS/

player2 5

player3 4

player1 3


Or use .reduce() if all you want is the high score.

var high_key = Object.keys(players)
                     .reduce(function(keya, keyb) {
                         return players[keya] > players[keyb] ? keya : keyb;
                     });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I need to go study up on object variables now. –  DA. Apr 19 '13 at 0:43
    
You're welcome. It's mostly just a map of key/value pairs. There's no particular order to the map, so for ordering, you need to convert the keys to an array and order that instead. –  squint Apr 19 '13 at 0:45
    
+1, even though it's the obvious answer. :-) Naturally the game architecture should be a little more sophisticated. –  RobG Apr 19 '13 at 1:25
var players = []; // Array of player scores.

// Assumes that all player scores are higher than -1. You could change this.
var winnerScore = -1, winner = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < players.length; i++) {
    if (players[i] > winnerScore) {
        winner = i;
        winnerScore = players[i];
    }
}

alert("The winner was player " + winner + "!");

That should do the trick :) If you want to handle ties, you could do this:

var players = []; // Array of player scores.

// Assumes that all player scores are higher than -1. You could change this.
var winnerScore = -1, winners = [];
for (var i = 0; i < players.length; i++) {
    if (players[i] > winnerScore) {
        winners = [i];
        winnerScore = players[i];
    } else if (players[i] == winnerScore) {
        winners.push(i);
    }
}

if (winners.length == 1) {
    alert("The winner was player " + winners[0] + "!");
} else {
    alert("The winners were players " + winners.join(", ") + "!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that would handle ties, though, would it? –  DA. Apr 19 '13 at 0:36
1  
@DA. I added a case that handles ties. –  Joe F Apr 19 '13 at 0:47

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