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Sorry for the extremely vague/confusing, I really didn't know how to name this issue. If someone has a better one please feel free too edit it. Onto my issue,

public class Foo()
{
    String name;
    public Foo()
    {
        Bar temp = new Bar();
    }
}    

public class Bar()
{
    public Bar()
    {
        setFooName("newName");
    }

    public void setFooName(String name)
    {   
        // Is it possible call a method in Foo?
    }
}    


public class test {
    static public void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Foo foobar = new Foo();
    }
}    

I'm still new to java so I'm not sure if this is even possible, but using C++ I'd normally have a local variable of the 'Foo' inside the 'Boo' class and then pass a reference to the object into the constructor of Bar and then assign it to the local variable in Bar.

As java doesn't have referencing I'm stuck on the matter. The reason I want to do this is the example I have is I need to create a GUI object inside of a class and then have information from the GUI object sent back to the class it was created in.

I do hope this all makes sense, if it doesn't, sorry.

share|improve this question
3  
What do you mean Java doesn't have referencing? Just pass a Foo object to your Bar class (probably in the constructor) if you need your Bar to operate on that Foo. –  Aurand Apr 19 '13 at 0:31
    
From what I read, doesn't this just create a copy of Foo, and not a pointer to the object itself? –  user1725794 Apr 19 '13 at 0:32
2  
@user1725794 No. Only primitives are pass by value in Java. –  Patashu Apr 19 '13 at 0:32
    
possible duplicate of Pass by value vs Pass by reference –  Makoto Apr 19 '13 at 0:32
    
@Patashu, primitives and Objects are "pass by value". See: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/arguments.html –  camickr Apr 19 '13 at 0:38

2 Answers 2

I think you're getting caught up on symantics.

The following example passes a copy of the reference of Foo to Bar via Bar's constructor. This now allows Bar to access properties of the instance of Foo. What it doesn't allow you to do is change the reference between the two (ie assigning a new reference of Foo within bar will not change the previous reference)

public class Foo()
{
    String name;
    public Foo()
    {
        Bar temp = new Bar(this);
    }
}    

public class Bar()
{
    private Foo foo;
    public Bar(Foo foo)
    {
        this.foo = foo;
        setFooName("newName");
    }

    public void setFooName(String name)
    {   
        // Is it possible call a method in Foo?
    }
}    


public class test {
    static public void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Foo foobar = new Foo();
    }
}  

Bar could then call any modifiers that Foo provides and it would change those individual properties of Foo for everybody who had a reference to that instance...

I hope that's close to what you're asking :P

share|improve this answer
1  
The following example passes a reference - it passes a copy of the reference. –  camickr Apr 19 '13 at 0:40
    
Tested the above code like suggested and it worked perfectly. I saw the "pass-by-value-vs-pass-by-reference" question but became extremely confused about it and wasn't sure at all. Sorry If my question was a time waste. –  user1725794 Apr 19 '13 at 0:42
    
You learned something, that's not a waste of time –  MadProgrammer Apr 19 '13 at 0:43
1  
The confusion comes from the terms people try to use. The important thing is to understand how it works. When you pass an object to a method, you can call the object's methods and mutate its internal state. The original object (that was passed to the method) will be updated. As camickr has pointed out, a copy of the reference is what is actually passed. This is why people say that Java is always pass by value. It just leads to confusion in my opinion, but there is an actual distinction. In C++ you could assign a new object to the reference. In Java you cannot. –  jahroy Apr 19 '13 at 0:49
    
@jahroy The last two sentences should have been an answer! +1 –  MadProgrammer Apr 19 '13 at 0:51

Actually you can do this in Java. Java has references, but not pointers. Confusingly, for C++ aficionados, these references can be null.

This means you can certainly do the following:

public class Bar {
    private Foo foo;
    public Bar(Foo foo) {
        this.foo = foo;
    }
    public setFooName(String name) {
        foo.setName(name);
    }
}
public class Foo {
    private String name;
    public Foo() {
        Bar temp = new Bar(this);
        temp.setFooName("fooname");
    }
}

But I'm not sure, in this instance, why you wouldn't just write:

public class Foo {
    private String name;
    public Foo() {
        this.name = "fooname";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The example was a much simplified version of the code I'm currently working with. I thought it'd be easier to show the issue with some simple code than have you fight with my many lines of code. –  user1725794 Apr 19 '13 at 1:00

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