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I've looked through the questions on this site but haven't found which matches my particular problem.

Assuming I have the following:

Product[] store1 = { new Product { Name = "apple", Code = 9, Code1="1" }, 
                   new Product { Name = "orange", Code = 4 } };

Product[] store2 = { new Product { Name = "apple", Code = 9, Code2="2" }, 
                   new Product { Name = "lemon", Code = 12 } };

With:

public class Product : IEquatable<Product>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Code { get; set; }
    public string Code1 { get; set; }
    public string Code2 { get; set; }

    public bool Equals(Product other)
    {

        //Check whether the compared object is null. 
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(other, null)) return false;

        //Check whether the compared object references the same data. 
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(this, other)) return true;

        //Check whether the products' properties are equal. 
        return Code.Equals(other.Code) && Name.Equals(other.Name);
    }

    // If Equals() returns true for a pair of objects  
    // then GetHashCode() must return the same value for these objects. 

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {

        //Get hash code for the Name field if it is not null. 
        int hashProductName = Name == null ? 0 : Name.GetHashCode();

        //Get hash code for the Code field. 
        int hashProductCode = Code.GetHashCode();

        //Calculate the hash code for the product. 
        return hashProductName ^ hashProductCode;
    }
}

How can I return a single Enumerable with the data from store1 overwritten with the data from store2 on matches and just inserted from store2 into store1 on non matches. Basically I'm looking for the C# equivalent of a TSQL Merge statement.

At the end of the day when running this:

foreach (var product in union)
      Console.WriteLine(product.Name + " " + product.Code + " " + product.Code1 + " " + product.Code2);

I'd like to get back:

apple 9 1 2

orange 4

lemon 12

However when I run this:

IEnumerable<Product> union = store1.Union(store2);

I get:

Apple 9 1

orange 4

lemon 12

and when I run this:

IEnumerable<Product> union = store1.Concat(store2);

I get:

Apple 9 1

orange 4

Apple 9 2

lemon 12

Thanks in advance for the help.

share|improve this question
    
What's the key value you want to override data ? –  minhcat_vo Apr 19 '13 at 2:19
    
this was just an example taken from this article on MSDN, but if i were to use this example in real life, id like to match on name and code and then overwrite code1 and code2 if they are blank in store1. –  DrRocket Apr 19 '13 at 13:36
    
@user1031517 What happens when you have { Name = "apple", Code = 9, Code1 = "1" } and { Name = "apple", Code = 9, Code1 = "2", Code2 = "2" }, in this case which should be considered? Here Code1 property overlaps in both items. And what should happen when we have many such overlapping products in both collections, which all should be considered then? Would a case like { Name = "apple", Code = 9, Code1 = "1" } and { Name = "apple", Code = 9, Code2 = "2" } come in the same collection itself, for example, in store1 ? –  nawfal Nov 9 '13 at 12:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
        //
        // Summary:
        //     Produces the set union of two sequences by using the default equality comparer.
        //
        // Parameters:
        //   first:
        //     An System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T> whose distinct elements form
        //     the first set for the union.
        //
        //   second:
        //     An System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T> whose distinct elements form
        //     the second set for the union.
        //
        // Type parameters:
        //   TSource:
        //     The type of the elements of the input sequences.
        //
        // Returns:
        //     An System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T> that contains the elements from
        //     both input sequences, excluding duplicates.
        //
        // Exceptions:
        //   System.ArgumentNullException:
        //     first or second is null.
public static IEnumerable<TSource> Union<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> first, IEnumerable<TSource> second);

for the reason that the function

excluding duplicates.

So you have to write your union function for Product[]

public static class ProductExtension
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Union<T>(this IEnumerable<T> store1, IEnumerable<T> store2)
    {
        List<T> List = new List<T>();
        foreach (var item in store2)
        {
            if (store1.Any(n=>n.Equals(item)))
            {
                var obj = store1.First(n => n.Equals(item));
                foreach (System.Reflection.PropertyInfo pi in obj.GetType().GetProperties())
                {
                    object v1 = pi.GetValue(obj, null);
                    object v2 = pi.GetValue(item, null);
                    var value = v1;
                    if (v2 != null && (v1 == null || v1.ToString() == string.Empty) && v1 != v2)
                    {
                        value = v2;
                    }
                    pi.SetValue(obj, value, null);
                }
                List.Add(obj);
            }
            else {
                List.Add(item);
            }            
        }

        foreach (var item in store1) { 
            if(!store2.Any(n=>n.Equals(item))){
                List.Add(item);
            }
        }
        return List.AsEnumerable();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Rather than rely on reflection, I would write my own functionality for it in Product class. Something like a AsCombo or CombineWith method:

public IEnumerable<Product> AsCombo(Product p)
{
    //if not equal, return both
    if (!Equals(p))
    {
        yield return this;
        yield return p;
        yield break;
    }

    //if equal return the one desired by checking all properties
    yield return new Product //always better to return new instance for linq queries
    { 
        Name = Name, 
        Code = Code, 
        Code1 = Code1 ?? p.Code1, //I give preference to 'this'
        Code2 = Code2 ?? p.Code2  //I give preference to 'this'
    };
}

Now all your standard Linq queries should work.

var combo = store1.Concat(store2)
                  .GroupBy(x => x)
                  .Where(x => x.Count() == 1)
                  .Select(x => x.Key) //get non duplicated products
                  .Concat(store1.Distinct() //concat them with combined form of duplicated products
                                .Join(store2.Distinct(), x => x, x => x, (x, y) => x.AsCombo(y))
                                .SelectMany(x => x))
                  .ToList();

It's little easier with below query, but then that's relying on implementation of Union (assuming Union keeps the duplicate of first or outer sequence and discards duplicates from subsequent/inner sequences). Not recommended.

var combo = store1.Join(store2, x => x, x => x, (x, y) => x.AsCombo(y))
                  .SelectMany(x => x)
                  .Union(store1)
                  .Union(store2)
                  .ToList();
share|improve this answer

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