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In the C language, why use the following line to define a constant with all bits set to 1?:

#define EXTENDED_MEM_END    ((unsigned) -1)

Instead of using the following?:

#define EXTENDED_MEM_END    0xFFFFFFFF

Or just this?:

#define EXTENDED_MEM_END    -1

Does it have something to do with portability (i.e., avoiding warnings), with a very specific code, and/or something else?

I suspect that, since the C code is going to have the EXTENDED_MEM_END identifier replaced by ((unsigned) -1), it is in fact a way to use the correct/expected value.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#define EXTENDED_MEM_END    0xFFFFFFFF

isn't right if ints aren't 32 bits;

#define EXTENDED_MEM_END    -1

isn't unsigned.

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Note that -1u would be correct, however, and much simpler. –  R.. Apr 19 '13 at 2:44
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@R.. I just answered the OP's question of what's wrong with the alternatives. There are numerous ways to express the correct value ... yours being the shortest, but UINT_MAX might be clearer (though that Minix code probably predates stdint.h). –  Jim Balter Apr 19 '13 at 2:50
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By the way, on a related note, I finally found a use for sizeof(char): -sizeof(char) is a portable way to get SIZE_MAX, aka (size_t)-1, without depending on any headers being included. –  R.. Apr 19 '13 at 2:51
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@R.. That's a fun fact, but I'll continue to use meaningful names and include headers. :-) –  Jim Balter Apr 19 '13 at 2:54
    
@R.. but that version wouldn't work in the preprocessor :( –  Jens Gustedt Apr 19 '13 at 6:10
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On a 32-bit machine, trying to define 64 1-bits will overflow, and give a warning -- but on a 64-bit machine, defining only 32 1-bits will give the wrong value.

((unsigned)-1) will produce the correct result under all circumstances (it's required by the standard).

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@JimBalter Read the last sentence - it's required by the standard. Wrap-around behavior for unsigned integers is well defined regardless of the bit representation. –  Praetorian Apr 19 '13 at 2:39
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Assuming unsigned int has 32 value bits, 0xffffffff will give the correct value. I'm confused why you think it wouldn't. The issue is cleanliness or portability to machines where the type is larger/smaller, not anything to do with ones complement or sign/magnitude. –  R.. Apr 19 '13 at 2:44
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@R..: You're right about one's complement and sign/magnitude -- not sure what I was thinking of there. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 19 '13 at 2:51
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I'm talking about the part of the answer you just edited out... –  R.. Apr 19 '13 at 2:52
    
@R.. He said you're right ... that's why he edited it out. Maybe you read "not sure what I was thinking of" and thought "I" referred to yourself? –  Jim Balter Apr 19 '13 at 5:15
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For a 32 bit OS , -1 is same as 0xFFFFFFFF but for a 64 bit OS ,0xFFFFFFFF is considered as 0x00000000FFFFFFFF, so it value is not -1 but a high positive value.

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Alternatively, use UINT_MAX from <limits.h> . This will be portable. The other alternatives fail on different architectures ((unsigned)-1) (fails on non-two's complement architectures (not that you'll have that problem much in practice)) or 0xffffffff (fails on 64-bit architectures) or 0xffffffffffffffff (fails on 32-bit architectures).

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The OP isn't looking for more alternatives ... the question is about why specific alternatives weren't used. –  Jim Balter Apr 19 '13 at 5:17
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