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Each digit should be replaced by its name spelled out (zero, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine) but I keep getting this as in my new file:

zero0000000001one111111112222222222333three3333334444four4444455555five5555666666six666 

here is my program:

def numbers(fileName):
    #open the inputed file ,prompt for the file 
    inFile= open(fileName,'r') #this will open the function for writing and reading 
    outFile=open('converted.txt', 'w')
    for line in inFile:
        wordList=line.split()
        for word in wordList:
            if  word == '0':
                outFile.write("zero")
            else:
                outFile.write(word) 

            if word =="1":
                outFile.write("one")
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word in wordList == "2":
                outFile.write("two")
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("3"):
                outFile.write("three")
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("4"):
                outFile.write("four")
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("5"):
                outFile.write("five")
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("6"):
                outFile.write("six")
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("7"):
                outFile.write(word)
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("8"):
                outFile,write(word)
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)

            if word == ("9"):
                outFile.write(word)
            #else:
                #outFile.write(word)
    outFile.write(" ")
    outFile.write("\n")
    outFile.close()
    inFile.close()
share|improve this question
    
how is word initialised? –  Aswin Murugesh Apr 19 '13 at 2:26

8 Answers 8

digit_names = {'1': 'one',
               '2': 'two',
               ...
               '9': 'ten'}

mystring = open('in.txt', 'r').read()
for d, n in digit_names.iteritems():
    mystring = mystring.replace(d, n)

open('converted.txt', 'w').write(mystring)

That's everything you need. For python3 use digit_names.items(), not digit_names.iteritems().

share|improve this answer

Here is your problem

    for word in wordList:
        if  word == '0':
            outFile.write("zero")
        else:
            outFile.write(word) 

For every word that is not '0' you output what the word is in the 'else' part. So for example every 1 will print out 1 due to not being 0, even if it later prints out one.

I call this problem the 'early default' problem, where you do the default action the first time a check fails. To not suffer from the 'early default' problem, delay doing the default action as long as possible. In this case, you want a big if... else if chain of every possible outcome for word that is special (== "0" through to =="9") and then the final else of the else if chain will be the default action of writing word.

Something like

        if word == "0":
            outFile.write("zero")
        elif word == "1":
            outFile.write("one")
        elif word == "2":
            outFile.write("two")
...
        else:
            outFile.write(word)

A more pythonic formulation however would be to use a list:

numberWords = ["zero", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine"]

then do this in the for loop:

try:
    outFile.write(numberWords[int(word)]) # attempt to convert word to an int, then look in the list for its word
except ValueError: # if word was not a string version of an int
    outFile.write(word)

This saves you from writing a huuuuuuuge if/elif/else chain and is easier to maintain too (for example, you can do an operation on all numberWords at once, e.g. to make them upper case, or load them from a file, or...)

share|improve this answer

if you want the name to be spelt out for all digits, then why have you used

if word == "7":
    outFile.write(word)

for 7,8,9? I think thats the error

share|improve this answer

Your if/else blocks are pretty messed up. You should get rid of all of the else statements, and use elif after the first if, like this:

    for word in wordList:
        if  word == '0':
            outFile.write("zero")
        elif word =="1":
            outFile.write("one")
        elif word == "2": # note that what you had here was very bad: if word in wordList == "2":
            outFile.write("two")
        elif word == "3":
            outFile.write("three")
        elif word == "4":
            outFile.write("four")
        elif word == "5":
            outFile.write("five")
        elif word == "6":
            outFile.write("six")
        elif word == "7":
            outFile.write("seven")
        elif word == "8":
            outFile,write("eight")
        elif word == "9":
            outFile.write("nine")
        else:
            # If you want to leave any other character unchanged, then you say:
            outFile.write(word)
share|improve this answer

Change your individual if/else statements to one if/elif/else statment

if word == '1':
     outFile.write("one")
 elif word == '2':
      outFile.write("two")
 elif word == '3':
      outFile.write("three")
 else:
      outFile.write("four")
share|improve this answer

I'd start with a dictionary for mapping digits to their names and then define a function to take the string representation of a number and return the string expanded with this mapping.

To make it a little more flexible I'd have a flag (tolerant) to either filter any non-digits out of the output, or retain them, and another to allow the caller to provide their own custom separator.

    #!/usr/bin/python

    digit_names = {
        '0': 'zero',
        '1': 'one',
        '2': 'two',
        '3': 'three',
        '4': 'four',
        '5': 'five',
        '6': 'six',
        '7': 'seven',
        '8': 'eight',
        '9': 'nine'
        }

    def digit2name(num, tolerant=True, separator=''):
        '''Replace a number (string of digits) with an expansion into the
           mapping of each digit to its name.
        '''
        return separator.join([digit_names.get(x,(x,'')[tolerant]) for x in num])

        '''
        results = list()
        num = str(num)
        for digit in num:
            if tolerant:
                default=digit
            else:
                default=''
            results.append(digit_names.get(digit,digit))
        return separator.join(results)
        '''

    if __name__ == '__main__':
        import sys
        for each in sys.argv[1:]:
            print digit2name(each),
            print digit2name(each, False, '.')
            print

I've done this as a one-liner using a list comprehension and also as a more readable and explicit loop (which I prefer).

share|improve this answer

No need to use a dictionary since a list of names can be accessed by int(word)

def numbers(fileName):
    #open the inputed file ,prompt for the file 
    inFile= open(fileName,'r') #this will open the function for writing and reading 
    outFile=open('converted.txt', 'w')
    for line in inFile:
        wordList=line.split()
        names = ['zero', 'one', 'two', 'three', 'four',
                 'five', 'six', 'seven', 'eight', 'nine']
        [outFile.write(names[int(word)]) for word in wordList]
    outFile.write(" ")
    outFile.write("\n")
    outFile.close()
    inFile.close()
share|improve this answer
  1. first build an dict to store digit mapping to it's name

    digit_name = {
             '1': 'one',
             '2': 'two',
             '3': 'three',
             ...
             }
    
  2. then format it when write to file

    for word in wordList:
        outFile.write(digit_name.get(word, word))
    

Or store output in an list then write to file once.

new_word_list = [digit_name.get(word, word) for word in wordlist]
share|improve this answer

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