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Here I allocated NSString variables ten different ways, and I want to know the retain count for all of them.

@interface SomeClass : NSObject 
{ 
   NSString *str1; 
   NSString *str2;
} 
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* str1;
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString * str2; 


 - str1 =@"hello";

 - self.str1 = @"hello";

 - str1 = [[NSString alloc]init];

 - self.str4 = [[NSString alloc]init];

 - str1 = [[[NSString alloc]init]autorelease];

 - self.str1 = [[[NSString alloc]init]autorelease];

 - str1 = [[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"];

 - self.str1 = [[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"];

 - str1 = [[[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"]autorelease];

 - self.str1 = [[[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"]autorelease];

What are the retain count of NSString allocations mentioned above? How can I know the retain count of them are retain count different for all of them?

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2  
why you care about retain count at all? retainCount should not be used anyway –  Bryan Chen Apr 19 '13 at 3:00
    
Because this question asked me in a interview of a company..so want to know the answer. –  Wish Apr 19 '13 at 3:01
1  
As was pointed out, retain count is useless. The real questions are how does Objective-C deal with string literals and who has ownership. –  Brian Nickel Apr 19 '13 at 3:27
4  
Your reply should be "It is not possible to know because of the way reference counting works. By chance, did you mean the relative retain count?" –  borrrden Apr 19 '13 at 4:15
1  
Tell the company to switch to Automated Reference Counting instead –  fishinear Apr 21 '13 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

While this seems like a homework assignment, you can call retainCount on each string to get an approximation of the real value. You should absolutely not use this method for any logic in a production app (see http://whentouseretaincount.com)! The documentation states:

Special Considerations

This method is of no value in debugging memory management issues. Because any number of framework objects may have retained an object in order to hold references to it, while at the same time autorelease pools may be holding any number of deferred releases on an object, it is very unlikely that you can get useful information from this method.

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I assume they are accessed in some SomeClass method. Variants:

// replace str1 with str2(copy), retain count will remain the same
str1 = @"hello";
self.str1 = @"hello"
str1 = [[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"];
self.str1 = [[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"];
str1 = [[[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"]autorelease];
self.str1 = [[[NSString alloc]initWithString:@"hello"]autorelease];

Here you'll end up with a huge value, like UINT_MAX, compiler will optimize your code (you pass literal value, NSString is immutable) and those objects will be unreleasable.

self.str1 = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"a string %d", 5]; // with autorelease or not - the same

Here you'll end up with a release count = 2, you alloc string +1, you assign a retain property +1 = 2.

self.str2 = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"a string %d", 5]; // with autorelease or not - the same

Here you'll end up with a release count = 1, you alloc string +1, you assign a copy proprty, thus create a copy of created string = 1.

In all other situations you'll end up with release count = 1, autorelease does not add to retain count, it just decrements it by 1 when the pool drains.

Just remember:

  1. Do not rely on retainCount,
  2. When you create object via alloc, new, copy, mutable copy - it's your responsibility to release it. If you create object with like [NSString string] it will be autoreleased.
  3. retain property retains object, copy property copies object, properties are only used via dot notation (self.property etc.)
  4. It's time to move to ARC. So if you can you should.
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thanks for your good answer +1.But still waiting for full answer. –  Wish Apr 19 '13 at 4:27
    
What did I miss? I've covered all the possible cases. –  MANIAK_dobrii Apr 19 '13 at 4:38
    
What will be retain count for first two... str1 = @"hello"; self.str1 = @"hello" –  Wish Apr 24 '13 at 7:19
    
@Wish As it's written in my answer, huge value like UINT_MAX. –  MANIAK_dobrii Apr 24 '13 at 7:32
    
ok means no retain count and no need to release right? –  Wish Apr 24 '13 at 7:39

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