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I have table like this

file_nbr    name_seq    Person_name

10  1   James Linson

10  1   Ronn Dave

10  1   Michael Meyer

12  1   Pamela  J. Mayberry  

12  1   Randall M. Bachtel 

12  1   Cleary E. Mahaffey 

12  1   D. Scott Rowley

12  1   Stephen  L. Phelps 

12  1   Mark A. Bennet

12  1   Richard  P. Lewis 

I want to change the name_seq, so the result like this:

10  1   James Linson

10  2   Ronn Dave

10  3   Michael Meyer

12  1   Pamela  J. Mayberry  

12  2   Randall M. Bachtel 

12  3   Cleary E. Mahaffey 

12  4   D. Scott Rowley

12  5   Stephen  L. Phelps 

12  6   Mark A. Bennet

12  7   Richard  P. Lewis 

What's the best SQL query?

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you should remove tabs with spaces to get the columns properly aligned, and probably remove the blank lines as well. –  Anthon Apr 19 '13 at 3:35

1 Answer 1

WITH records
AS
(
    SELECT  "file_nbr",
            ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY "file_nbr" ORDER BY "file_nbr") "name_seq",
            "Person_name"
    FROM    TableName
)
SELECT  "file_nbr", "name_seq", "Person_name"
FROM    records
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I really need to take some time to learn how this over/partition syntax works! –  Sepster Apr 19 '13 at 3:21
    
@Sepster - it's all in the docs docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/… –  APC Apr 19 '13 at 4:12
    
It's redundant to ORDER BY file_nbr if you're already PARTITIONing by it - the ORDER BY is within a partition, so it's effectively sorted in whatever order the rows get examined. –  Jeffrey Kemp Apr 19 '13 at 4:25
    
You need an order by clause though; order by null would be sufficient and might be clearer, to indicate there is no real ordering within the partition. –  Alex Poole Apr 19 '13 at 8:45

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