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This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to get the fastest performance for this DELETE (and SELECT) query. Is there a better way to DELETE the records, because this takes over 10 minutes to run? I imagine it has to do it's own sort and merge until it can find the records.

SELECT COUNT([VISIT_ID])
FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS]
WHERE [PATIENT_ID] NOT IN (
    SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_PATIENT]
)

DELETE FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS]
WHERE [PATIENT_ID] NOT IN (
    SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_PATIENT]
)

EDIT: I couldn't put the DELETE in front of that query like I did with the SELECT. But this was the end result for the DELETE statement.

DELETE FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS]
WHERE [VISIT_ID] IN
(
    SELECT a.[VISIT_ID]
    FROM    [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS] a
            LEFT JOIN [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_PATIENT] b
                ON a.[PATIENT_ID] = b.[PATIENT_ID]
    WHERE b.[PATIENT_ID]  IS NULL
)
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by RichardTheKiwi, Jonathan Leffler, sjngm, Peter Ritchie, Rachel Gallen Apr 20 '13 at 0:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
ExplainExtended BlogSQLAuthority and many other online literature will steer you towards NOT IN/NOT EXISTS as you have already written. However, there are always exceptions, such as when you DON'T have the necessary indexes (which could sometimes be valid). Always try as many forms as you know and use what works well. For small datasets though, it probably doesn't matter. – RichardTheKiwi Apr 19 '13 at 3:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

how about doing it via JOIN?

DELETE  a
FROM    [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS] a
        LEFT JOIN [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_PATIENT] b
            ON a.[PATIENT_ID] = b.[PATIENT_ID]
WHERE   b.[PATIENT_ID] IS NULL

Make sure that column [PATIENT_ID] from both tables has key define on them which makes it more faster.


Right. NOT EXIST is better one.

DELETE  a 
FROM    [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS] a 
WHERE   NOT EXISTS
        ( 
            SELECT  1 
            FROM    [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_PATIENT] b
            WHERE   a.[PATIENT_ID] = b.[PATIENT_ID] 
        )
share|improve this answer
1  
also try this syntax using NOT EXIST: DELETE a FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_VISITS] a WHERE NOT EXIST ( SELECT 1 FROM [dbo].[I2B2_SRC_PATIENT] b WHERE a.[PATIENT_ID] = b.[PATIENT_ID] ) – John Woo Apr 19 '13 at 3:27
1  
Probably - not enough rows to hit a tipping point. See sqlperformance.com/2012/12/t-sql-queries/left-anti-semi-join – Aaron Bertrand Apr 19 '13 at 3:36
1  
@JW are you sure they're the same plan? I see an extra TOP operator with NOT EXISTS and an anti-semi join. The other one has LEFT OUTER JOIN which looks like it materializes the rows and subsequently FILTERs. Check the first link in my comment against the question. – RichardTheKiwi Apr 19 '13 at 3:38
1  
@AaronBertrand right. justed it here. NOT EXISTS is better sqlfiddle.com/#!3/244f5/1 – John Woo Apr 19 '13 at 3:46
3  
@JW A hint. With 2 queries like that, despite all the inaccuracies and lies spouted by the query optimizer, you can see their relative estimated costs by making it a single batch, e.g. sqlfiddle.com/#!3/244f5/2/0. The (single) plan shows both queries, and the costs are now easier to compare. – RichardTheKiwi Apr 19 '13 at 3:55

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