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I have the following [heavily snipped] code:

data = {};
data['someradio'] = '2';

for(key in data)
{
    if(data.hasOwnProperty(key))
    {
        if(key == 'someradio')
        {
            document.getElementById(key + '1').checked = data[key] == '1' ? true : false;
            document.getElementById(key + '2').checked = data[key] == '2' ? true : false;
            document.getElementById(key + '3').checked = data[key] == '3' ? true : false;
        }
    }
}

Is there a way to condense the 3 document. lines in to 1?

There are actually 12 (not 3) recurrences of this line, with only the number changed.

share|improve this question
1  
Of course. Use a loop, and concatenate the loop counter, like key + i. Also, you can get rid of the inner if by using && key == 'someradio' in the first if condition, and you can shorten the .checked assignment to .checked = data[key] == i. – squint Apr 19 '13 at 4:17
    
if(key == 'someradio') so you're iterating over an object to find a particular key? Why not use data.someradio instead? – zerkms Apr 19 '13 at 4:17
    
When x is boolean, replace x ? true : false with x. If you just want to booleanize an expression, use not twice. !! (3 -3) is false. – Eric Jablow Apr 19 '13 at 4:19
1  
@amnotiam Ah, of course! Mind went blank... that's what I get for working at 5am! RE: using && key == 'someradio', this is actually part of a much larger switch. Nice point on shortening the .checked assignment; I'd never tried doing that before. – Danny Beckett Apr 19 '13 at 4:20
    
@zerkms It's actually part of a much larger switch, with a default handling for most keys, but cases for some edge-cases ;) – Danny Beckett Apr 19 '13 at 4:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted
data = {};
data['someradio'] = '2';

for(key in data)
{
    if(data.hasOwnProperty(key))
    {
        if(key == 'someradio')
        { 
            for (var i = 1; i <= 3 /*put desired value there */; i++) {
               document.getElementById(key + i).checked = data[key] == i ? true : false;            
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
var counter = 13;

while ( --counter ) {
    document.getElementById(key + counter).checked = data[key] == counter;
}
share|improve this answer
5  
I think a for loop might be a little easier to read. – Blender Apr 19 '13 at 4:20
    
@Derek朕會功夫 - Your way would have counter be 11 within the block the first time it runs... – Joseph Silber Apr 19 '13 at 4:21
3  
If you're going to declare a counter variable and use it as the loop condition, you may as well just use a for loop. – Dan Apr 19 '13 at 4:22
    
@Derek朕會功夫 - How would that be any different? – Joseph Silber Apr 19 '13 at 4:23
1  
@Dan, Blender - That's all a matter of opinion. I hate for loops. They look ugly. – Joseph Silber Apr 19 '13 at 4:23

Well here's one cheaper way:

data = {};
data['someradio'] = '2';

var key = 'someradio';
var p;
if (p = data[key]) {
    for(var i = 1; i < 4; i++) {
        document.getElementById(key + i).checked = (i == p);
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/JbpBx/

share|improve this answer
1  
jQuery most definitely does not have hasOwnProperty built into $.each. – Joseph Silber Apr 19 '13 at 4:26
1  
Loading jQuery just to use an iterator would be... odd. – squint Apr 19 '13 at 4:29
    
@JosephSilber You're right I should clarify what I meant - he seemed to be using it to ensure the property was one assigned, not a built-in property. The way jQuery loops through objects gets you that functionality for free. But it's moot anyway since it wasn't necessary to do what he was asking. – Chris Moschini Apr 19 '13 at 4:38

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