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package override;

class Super
{
    public void dosomething()
    {
        System.out.println("hello Super");
    }
}

class sub 
    extends Super
{
    @Override
    public void dosomething()
    {
        System.out.println("hello sub");
    }
}

public class Main 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Super p1=new Super();
        Super p2=new sub();  // Please explain why this line is correct as constructor and //class name should be same
        p1.dosomething();
        p2.dosomething();
    }
}

How can I invoke a method when I created a object with different class name and different constructor name. Like the statement highlighted above has a different way of invoking a constructor

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2  
This is the concept of polymorphism in java.docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/polymorphism.html –  prasanth Apr 19 '13 at 4:40
    
sub is extending Super, hence that line is valid. –  Sudhanshu Apr 19 '13 at 4:40
    
Also, the class name should be capital 'S' Sub as per java naming conventions and dosomething() should be doSomething(). –  Sanchit Apr 19 '13 at 4:42

3 Answers 3

 Super p2=new sub();
 p2.doSomething();

This is called Run Time Polymorphism (Method Overriding).

Compiler does not call the method that is defined by the variable's type (ie super in this case). This behavior is referred to as virtual method invocation and demonstrates an aspect of the important polymorphism features in the Java language.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/polymorphism.html

Object p2 is of type Super. But p2 is referring sub. So the compiler at run time runs the doSomething() in sub class. Super class has method doSomething().

But if you have say eat() in sub

Super p2=new sub();
p2.eat(); // not possible

Super class does not have method eat().

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Thank u so much ! –  user2261650 Apr 23 '13 at 3:10

Polymprphism is what you are making use of.

If we change Super to Animal and Sub to Cat then you have:

Animal p1 = new Cat();

Can you treat a Cat as an Animal? Sure, because a Cat is an Animal (because Cat extends Animal).

When you call to doSomething method the VM looks at what type you did the new on and looks there for the method. If it finds it then it calls that one, otherwise it looks at the parent class for it. That is called method overriding, which is how polymorphism works.

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p2 is just referencing the object new sub() object. And now p2 can invoke only those methods which were there in Super class and Sub has overridden them. This is runtime polymorphism.

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thank u...i got it now –  user2261650 Apr 23 '13 at 3:12

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