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I'm trying to (in python) fit a series of an arbitrary number of gaussian functions (determined by a simple algorithm still being improved) to a data set. For my current sample data set, I have 174 gaussian functions. I have a procedure for doing the fit, but it's basically complicated guess-and-check, and consumes all 4GB of memory available.

Is there any way to accomplish this using something in scipy or numpy?

Here is what I'm trying to use, where wavelength[] is the list of x-coordinates, and fluxc[] is the list of y-coordinates:

#Pick a gaussian
for repeat in range(0,2):
    for f in range(0,len(centroid)):
        #Iterate over every other gaussian
        for i in range(0,len(centroid)):
            if i!= f:
                #For every wavelength,
                for w in wavelength:
                    #Append the value of each to an list, called others
                    others.append(height[i]*math.exp(-(w-centroid[i])**2/(2*width[i]**2)))

    #Optimize the centroid of the current gaussian
        prev = centroid[f]
        best = centroid[f]
        #Pick an order of magnitude
        for p in range (int(round(math.log10(centroid[i]))-3-repeat),int(round(math.log10(centroid[i])))-6-repeat,-1):
            #Pick a value of that order of magnitude
            for m in range (-5,9):
                #Change the value of the current item
                centroid[f] = prev + m * 10 **(p)
                #Increment over all wavelengths, make a list of the new values
                variancy = 0
                residual = 0
                test = []
                #Increment across every wavelength and evaluate if this change gets R^2 any larger
                for k in range(0,len(wavelength)):
                    test.append(height[i]*math.exp(-(wavelength[k]-centroid[f])**2/(2*width[i]**2)))
                    residual += (test[k]+others[k]-cflux[k])**2
                    variancy += (test[k]+others[k]-avgcflux)**2
                rsquare = 1-(residual/variancy)
                #Check the R^2 value for this new fit
                if rsquare > bestr:
                    bestr = rsquare
                    best = centroid[f]
        centroid[f] = best

    #Optimize the height of the current gaussian
        prev = height[f]
        best = height[f]
        #Pick an order of magnitude
        for p in range (int(round(math.log10(height[i]))-repeat),int(round(math.log10(height[i])))-3-repeat,-1):
            #Pick a value of that order of magnitude
            for m in range (-5,9):
                #Change the value of the current item
                height[f] = prev + m * 10 **(p)
                #Increment over all wavelengths, make a list of the new values
                variancy = 0
                residual = 0
                test = []
                #Increment across every wavelength and evaluate if this change gets R^2 any larger
                for k in range(0,len(wavelength)):
                    test.append(height[f]*math.exp(-(wavelength[k]-centroid[i])**2/(2*width[i]**2)))
                    residual += (test[k]+others[k]-cflux[k])**2
                    variancy += (test[k]+others[k]-avgcflux)**2
                rsquare = 1-(residual/variancy)
                #Check the R^2 value for this new fit
                if rsquare > bestr:
                    bestr = rsquare
                    best = height[f]
        height[f] = best

    #Optimize the width of the current gaussian
        prev = width[f]
        best = width[f]
        #Pick an order of magnitude
        for p in range (int(round(math.log10(width[i]))-repeat),int(round(math.log10(width[i])))-3-repeat,-1):
            #Pick a value of that order of magnitude
            for m in range (-5,9):
                if prev + m * 10**(p) == 0:
                    m+=1
                #Change the value of the current item
                width[f] = prev + m * 10 **(p)
                #Increment over all wavelengths, make a list of the new values
                variancy = 0
                residual = 0
                test = []
                #Increment across every wavelength and evaluate if this change gets R^2 any larger
                for k in range(0,len(wavelength)):
                    test.append(height[i]*math.exp(-(wavelength[k]-centroid[i])**2/(2*width[f]**2)))
                    residual += (test[k]+others[k]-cflux[k])**2
                    variancy += (test[k]+others[k]-avgcflux)**2
                rsquare = 1-(residual/variancy)
                #Check the R^2 value for this new fit
                if rsquare > bestr:
                    bestr = rsquare
                    best = width[f]
        width[f] = best
        count += 1
        #print '{} of {} peaks optimized, iteration {} of {}'.format(f+1,len(centroid),repeat+1,2)
        complete = round(100*(count/(float(len(centroid))*2)),2)
        print '{}% completed'.format(complete)
    print 'New R^2 = {}'.format(bestr)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it can likely be done better (easier) using scipy. But firstly, refactor your code into smaller functions; it justs makes it a lot easier to read and understand what's going on.

As for the memory consumption: you're probably overextending a list far too much somewhere (others is a candidate: I never see it cleared (or initialized!), while it gets filled in a quadruple loop). That, or your data is simply that large (in which case you really should be using numpy arrays, just to speed up things). I can't tell, because you're introducing various variables without giving any idea of the size (how big is wavelengths? How large does others get? What and where are all the initializations of your data arrays?)

Also, fitting 174 Gaussians is just a bit crazy; either look into another way of determining whatever you want to get out of your data, or split things up. From the wavelengths variable, it appears you're trying to fit lines in a high resolution spectrum; perhaps isolating most of the lines and fitting those isolated groups separately is better. If they all overlap, I doubt any normal fitting technique is going to help you.

Lastly, perhaps a package like pandas can help (e.g., the computation subpackage).

Perhaps very lastly, since I see a lot that can be improved in the code. At some point codereview may also be useful. Though for now I guess your memory usage is the most problematic part.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply! This is only about a third of all the code I've written, everything is initialized earlier on. It is for analyzing a high-resolution spectra, right now with 992 data points. Is that far too many? I'd like to try to avoid breaking up the data before analyzing it, so I can extract as much useful data as possible. –  user2297781 Apr 19 '13 at 15:35
    
Ha! Others was my memory problem, thanks. –  user2297781 Apr 19 '13 at 15:51

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