Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have to write a program to determine the longest common sub sequence.

Input:

The first argument will be a file that contains two strings per line, semicolon delimited. You can assume that there is only one unique subsequence per test case. e.g.

XMJYAUZ;MZJAWXU

Output:

The longest common subsequence. Ensure that there are no trailing empty spaces on each line you print. e.g.

MJAU

I am using Dev C++ .. And it is compiling Fine!...But this question is a programming challenge and when i submit my answer it's showing me a segmentation fault!

I have written the following code and i am getting a Segmentation Fault where am i wrong?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
char str1[100],str2[100];
int len1;
int len2;
void printLCS(char b[len1][len2],char str1[],int i,int j)
{
    if(i==0 || j==0)
    return;
    if(b[i][j]=='c')
    {
        printLCS(b,str1,i-1,j-1);
        printf("%c",str1[i-1]);
    }
    else if(b[i][j]=='l')
    printLCS(b,str1,i,j-1);
    else
    printLCS(b,str1,i-1,j);
}
void Seq(char str1[],char str2[])
{

    int i,j;
    len1=strlen(str1);
    len2=strlen(str2);
    int LCS[len1+1][len2+1];
    char b[len1][len2];
    for(i=0;i<=len1;i++)
    {
        LCS[i][0]=0;
    }
    for(j=0;j<=len2;j++)
    {
        LCS[0][j]=0;
    }
    for(i=1;i<=len1;i++)
    {
        for(j=1;j<=len2;j++)
        {
            if(str1[i-1]==str2[j-1])
            {
                LCS[i][j]=1+LCS[i-1][j-1];
                b[i][j]='c';
            }
            else if(LCS[i-1][j]>=LCS[i][j-1])
            {
                LCS[i][j]=LCS[i-1][j];
                b[i][j]='u';
            }
            else
            {
                LCS[i][j]=LCS[i][j-1];
                b[i][j]='l';
            }
        }
    }
    printLCS(b,str1,len1,len2);
}
int main(int argc,char *argv[])
{
    if(argc!=2)
    {
        printf("Invalid Number of Arguments:\n");
        exit(0);
    }
    FILE *fp;
    fp=fopen(argv[1],"r");
    if(fp==NULL)
    {
        printf("File can't be opened:\n");
        exit(0);
    }
    char c;
    c=fgetc(fp);
    while(c!=EOF)
    {
        int k=0;
        if(c=='\n')
        c=fgetc(fp);
        while(c!=';')
        {
            str1[k]=c;
            k++;
            c=fgetc(fp);
        }
        str1[k]='\0';
        c=fgetc(fp);
        k=0;
        while(c!=EOF && c!='\n')
        {
            str2[k]=c;
            k++;
            c=fgetc(fp);
        }
        str2[k]='\0';
        Seq(str1,str2);
        printf("\n");
        if(c==EOF)
        {
            break;
        }
        else
        c=fgetc(fp);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
This doesn't compile for me(C11) int len1; int len2; void printLCS(char b[len1][len2] – user1944441 Apr 19 '13 at 6:51
    
@armin:So how should i pass the matrix b?I have defined len1 & len2 Globally! – user2227862 Apr 19 '13 at 6:53
    
The correct way, if you want a longer answer you should ask a new question about it. – user1944441 Apr 19 '13 at 6:54
1  
@user2227862 Perhaps you missed Armin's point. The code doesn't compile, therefore it cannot seg-fault, therefore the question makes little sense. Perhaps fixing the code so it compiles and thus exhibits the problem would be a good starting point. (And it compiles for me, but I'm not running C11, which I find hard to be the culprit for the broken build, but thats another issue) – WhozCraig Apr 19 '13 at 6:55
    
@WhozCraig The code seems to be correct ideone.com/vpQWNF My compiler must have a bad day. :( – user1944441 Apr 19 '13 at 7:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I dont know system of this site but; i compiled with no error, and result was true.

You didnt close file. Maybe memory leak etc. didnt allowed by site.

And, dont use global variables, unless you dont know another solution

this usage is very very bad! ISO C90 forbids this, anyway

int len1;
int len2;
void printLCS(char b[len1][len2]...

good luck.

share|improve this answer

If you've got access to a Mac or Linux system, there's a fantastic tool called valgrind which can help you track down these kinds of errors: basically it runs your program in a virtual machine and monitors what it reads and writes to memory.

Whilst I can't compile your code, I'm pretty suspicious about this for loop:

   for(i=1;i<=len1;i++)
{
    for(j=1;j<=len2;j++)
    {
        if(str1[i-1]==str2[j-1])
        {
            LCS[i][j]=1+LCS[i-1][j-1];
            b[i][j]='c';
        }
        else if(LCS[i-1][j]>=LCS[i][j-1])
        {
            LCS[i][j]=LCS[i-1][j];
            b[i][j]='u';
        }
        else
        {
            LCS[i][j]=LCS[i][j-1];
            b[i][j]='l';
        }
    }
}

Arrays in C and C++ start at 0, so the maximum offset you're interested in is probably strlen - 1. Try changing your for loops to

for(i=1;i<len1;i++)
{
  for(j=1;j<len2;j++) 
  {
     ...
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The adressed arrays have size+1, to allow for the begin/end conditions. – wildplasser Jun 16 '13 at 21:55
    
LCS does seem to be size+1, but b seems to be just size. valgrind gives an invalid write warning at line 44 when run a modified version of the file. – struct Jun 16 '13 at 22:05
    
You are correct. the b[][] array is addressed out of bounds. – wildplasser Jun 16 '13 at 22:07
    
Have to admit, I'm surprised that it even prints anything: it doesn't look like the first elements of either dimension of b get assigned to. – struct Jun 16 '13 at 22:10
    
I didn't look too deeply into the code, I stepped out two monthe ago after seeing the char c; thing. IMHO, the combination of CAPS LCS[][] and one letter b[][] identifyers tells the rest of the story. The OP doesn't seem to have that much interest in it, either. Plus: the attempt to compile C code (with VLAs) with a C++ compiler. – wildplasser Jun 16 '13 at 22:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.