Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a dataset that looks like this:

   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10 V11 V12 V13 V14 V15  
1   1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1   1   1   1   1   1   1  
2   1  1  1  1  1  1  1 -1 -1  -1  -1  -1  -1  -1  -1  
3   1  1  1 -1 -1 -1 -1  1  1   1   1  -1  -1  -1  -1 
4   1  1  1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1  -1  -1   1   1   1   1  
5   1 -1 -1  1  1 -1 -1  1  1  -1  -1   1   1  -1  -1  
6   1 -1 -1  1  1 -1 -1 -1 -1   1   1  -1  -1   1   1  
7   1 -1 -1 -1 -1  1  1  1  1  -1  -1  -1  -1   1   1  
8   1 -1 -1 -1 -1  1  1 -1 -1   1   1   1   1  -1  -1  
9  -1  1 -1  1 -1  1 -1  1 -1   1  -1   1  -1   1  -1  
10 -1  1 -1  1 -1  1 -1 -1  1  -1   1  -1   1  -1   1  
11 -1  1 -1 -1  1 -1  1  1 -1   1  -1  -1   1  -1   1  
12 -1  1 -1 -1  1 -1  1 -1  1  -1   1   1  -1   1  -1  
13 -1 -1  1  1 -1 -1  1  1 -1  -1   1   1  -1  -1   1 
14 -1 -1  1  1 -1 -1  1 -1  1   1  -1  -1   1   1  -1  
15 -1 -1  1 -1  1  1 -1  1 -1  -1   1  -1   1   1  -1  
16 -1 -1  1 -1  1  1 -1 -1  1   1  -1   1  -1  -1   1  

and I want to combine the first three colums into a single base on some principle:

111 → 1  
1 -1 -1→ 2  
-1 1 -1→ 3  
-1 -1 1→ 4 

This is my first time to use R language. I have no idea about how to do it. Does anyone have some simple pieces of code to do this? Thanks in advanced!

share|improve this question
    
Are just those 4 the conditions you would apply? – Michele Apr 19 '13 at 7:33
    
Have you any criteria to apply? Try rowSums(matrix(1:12, ncol = 3)) – Paulo Cardoso Apr 19 '13 at 7:39
    
See also this question how to create a lookup table: stackoverflow.com/questions/16092503/…;. You could paste your three columns together to create a unqiue identifier, and create a lookup table with the translation from that key to the associated value. See paste for pasting together strings/numbers. – Paul Hiemstra Apr 19 '13 at 7:40
    
In this case, I only have 4 conditions to apply. In other example, there exists 8 possible combinations of the first three columns. – Stacy Apr 19 '13 at 9:21
    
Step by step 1. How do I convert any 3 columns into a single one? 2. Convert 3 columns into a singlle one, and how I need sets of 2 columns, where these 2 columns are waht I got from the step 1. How do I obtain the sets? (Which is 2 combination of 2 new columns with each of then derived from three into 1) – Stacy Apr 21 '13 at 4:20
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I pretend your data frame is called df...

test <- apply(df[1:3], 1, paste, collapse="") # this will merge the numbers of the first 3
                                         # for each row

result <- sapply(test, switch, '111' = 1, '1-11' = 2, '-11-1' = 3, '-1-11' = 4)

in case result is a list use unlist

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 real nice use of switch! – Paul Hiemstra Apr 19 '13 at 9:08
    
Hello, Michele I really liked your solution. I have a small question here. I checked the lenght of "result" is 16 but when I use unlist(result) it will be changed to a "numeric" vector of length 12. Did I do anything wrong here ? – Jdbaba Apr 19 '13 at 14:08
    
@Jdbaba Probably because length(result) = nrow(df) after using sapply. However, there could be some NULL values in the list object result that are ignored by unlist which returns, in a numeric vector, only the non null values. This happens if the options you provide swicth with don't cover all the possible unique value among df. If you know them in advance just add to the four I've used, otherwise use unique(test) to have them all. – Michele Apr 19 '13 at 14:25

Given that there's 8 possible combinations of values from the first three columns, you might need to be a bit more specific on how you want to code your combined result. That said, this will give a mapping from those values to a single number. Assume your dataset is a data frame called dat:

as.numeric(factor(do.call(paste, dat[1:3])))
share|improve this answer
    
I totally ignored the fact you mention, thanks for your remind! I tried this instruction code and got this result: [1] 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 I just wondered if there is any way to change the result to : [1] 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 – Stacy Apr 19 '13 at 9:10
1  
@Stacy just reverse code using 5 - as in 5 - as.numeric(factor(do.call(paste, dat[1:3]))) – Tyler Rinker Apr 19 '13 at 13:29
1  
@Stacy try something like levels(result) <- c(1,2,3,4), where result is the result from @Hong code without as.numeric. – Michele Apr 19 '13 at 14:29
    
All of your suggestions are helpful. I tried all of them. Step by step, I got further, deeper understanding. Thanks for all of you. :) – Stacy Apr 20 '13 at 15:52
    
Step by step 1. How do I convert any 3 columns into a single one? 2. Convert 3 columns into a singlle one, and how I need sets of 2 columns, where these 2 columns are waht I got from the step 1. How do I obtain the sets? (Which is 2 combination of 2 new columns with each of then derived from three into 1) – Stacy Apr 21 '13 at 4:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.