Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a class with a member clientCache:

    public:
        LRUCache<string, string>* clientCache;

The cache is initated by:

    clientCache = new LRUCache<string, string>(3);

    //Reset cache to stored values if exist:
    ifstream ifs(this->cachePath.c_str(), ios::binary);

    // Verify that file exists
    if(ifs.good()){
        ifs.read((char *)&this->clientCache, sizeof(this->clientCache));
        printf("Persistent cache file loaded");
    }

In the destructor:

    ofstream ofs(this->cachePath.c_str(), ios::binary);
    ofs.write((char *)&this->clientCache, sizeof(this->clientCache));
    printf("Persistent cache file written with:");
    printf((char*)&this->clientCache); //-> Nothing gets printed 

Try to load back the file written in the previous step fails:

    ifstream ifs(this->cachePath.c_str(), ios::binary);
    // Verify that file exists
    if(ifs.good()){
        ifs.read((char *)&this->clientCache, sizeof(this->clientCache));
        printf("Persistent cache file loaded");
    }

Should the printed output really be empty? Is this a sign that the saving fails. Does the content (methods/members) of LRUCache class matter, i.e. will i be more successfull if i try to store all key values instead of the data of the entire instance?

share|improve this question
    
And the question is ? The output is ? The input is ? –  Offirmo Apr 19 '13 at 7:54
    
If your problem is the call to ifstream::read fails, what's the error code? If your problem is related to the "Nothing gets printed" comment then we would need to see the definition of the LRUCache class/template. You're casting it to a char* which implies the first member is a char array, but if it's not then the printf would be meaningless. Either way, more code needed. –  Jonathan Potter Apr 19 '13 at 7:55
    
are you trying to store a pointer this->clientCache to a stream? If you want to store the object i suggest you overload the >> and << operators –  spiritwolfform Apr 19 '13 at 7:59
    
Your approach is taking a shortcut by assuming that you can write/read the array ass if it would consist purely of data. This is bound to fail if you have virtual functions in on of you class members (including the strings) as the table for the virtual function pointers is (most likely) not the same between two instantiations of the program. –  ogni42 Apr 19 '13 at 8:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You mix std::basic_ostream::write and printf, which are unrelated. write is for unformatted output of character/byte data, whereas printf is style formatted output.

Furthermore, you cannot write a class to disk and read it back that way, because the binary layout of an object, especially the address of the virtual function table, may differ from one run of the program to another.

In this special case, you even write and read only the pointer to dynamic memory. When you read the pointer back, the memory it is supposed to point to, might not be allocated anymore.

Better write an appropriate input and output operator, which reads and writes the needed members only.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point, so we extended the cache object with functions for disk storage instead. –  David Karlsson Jun 12 '13 at 19:49
printf((char*)&this->clientCache); //-> Nothing gets printed 

I think this does not do what you want. Assuming clientCache is a pointer

LRUCache<string, string>* clientCache;

what happens is printing the pointer value (which shouldn't work), not the object stored in it.
Anyway, a better way to do it is using the << and >> operators to write and read the object

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.