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I have a string like this:

KEY1=Value1, KE_Y2=[V@LUE2A, Value2B], Key3=, KEY4=V-AL.UE4, KEY5={Value5}

I need to split it to get a Map with key-value pairs. Values in [] should be passed as a single value (KE_Y2 is a key and [V@LUE2A, Value2B] is a value).

What regular expression should I use to split it correctly?

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2  
You would be much better off writing a proper parser for that. If done properly it will be much more robust and easier to maintain than a regular expression. –  Till Helge Apr 19 '13 at 8:00
    
How do you want to store the keys/value? i.e. do you want to store them both as strings? I agree with @TillHelgeHelwig, it is also more flexible as you can add some "actions" when parsing. –  Sharpie Apr 19 '13 at 8:01
    
Yes. I need to put them in Map<String, String>. –  Max Saichuk Apr 19 '13 at 8:02
    
@Sharpie, TillHelgeHelwig, to write parser I still need a regex to get values followed by comma and space symbols. Is it a wrong way? –  Max Saichuk Apr 19 '13 at 8:11
    
Can you change the separator? if you had an end-of-line at the end of each value, this would be a classic properties file to be load as a classic Java Properties object –  Pablo Apr 19 '13 at 8:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There's a magic regex for the first split:

String[] pairs = input.split(", *(?![^\\[\\]]*\\])");

Then split each of the key/values with simply "=":

for (String pair : pairs) {
    String[] parts = pair.split("=");
    String key = parts[0];
    String value = parts[1];
}

Putting it all together:

Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
for (String pair : input.split(", *(?![^\\[\\]]*\\])")) {
    String[] parts = pair.split("=");
    map.put(parts[0], parts[1]);
}

Voila!


Explanation of magic regex:

The regex says "a comma followed by any number of spaces (so key names don't have leading blanks), but only if the next bracket encountered is not a close bracket"

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I spent 1.5 days trying to write correct regex. But you did it in fwe minnutes. Are you a wizard? Great thanks!!! –  Max Saichuk Apr 19 '13 at 8:23
    
No problem. A wizard? Well I like to think I'm getting better anyway :) btw see edited answer for the final code to use - all neat and tidy in a couple of lines. –  Bohemian Apr 19 '13 at 8:25
    
Beautiful, it's "like" my answer except with magic to prevent spliting the values. Good job! +1 –  Sharpie Apr 19 '13 at 8:32
    
It's Czech magic. (Although I have never seen Czechs so far south :P) –  brimborium Apr 19 '13 at 10:16

How about this:

Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
Pattern regex = Pattern.compile(
    "(\\w+)        # Match an alphanumeric identifier, capture in group 1\n" +
    "=             # Match =                                             \n" +
    "(             # Match and capture in group 2:                       \n" +
    " (?:          # Either...                                           \n" +
    "  \\[         #  a [                                                \n" +
    "  [^\\[\\]]*  #  followed by any number of characters except [ or ] \n" +
    "  \\]         #  followed by a ]                                    \n" +
    " |            # or...                                               \n" +
    "  [^\\[\\],]* #  any number of characters except commas, [ or ]     \n" +
    " )            # End of alternation                                  \n" +
    ")             # End of capturing group", 
    Pattern.COMMENTS);
Matcher regexMatcher = regex.matcher(subjectString);
while (regexMatcher.find()) {
    map.put(regexMatcher.group(1), regexMatcher.group(2));
} 
share|improve this answer

Start with @achintya-jha's answer. When you split a String, it will give you an array (or something that acts like it) so you can iterate throught the pair of key/value and then you do the second split which is supposed to give you another array of size 2; you then use the first element as the key and the second as the value.

EDIT:

I dind't found useful link for what I meant (see the comments on the question) in JAVA, (there is plenty of them for C/C++ though) so I wrote it:

Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
String str = "KEY1=Value1, KE_Y2=[V@LUE2A, Value2B]], Key3=, KEY4=V-AL.UE4, KEY5={Value5}";     


final String openBrackets =  "({[<";
final String closeBrackets = ")}]>";

String buffer = "";
int state = 0;
int i = 0;      
Stack<Integer> stack = new Stack<Integer>(); //For the brackets

String key = "";


while(  i < str.length() ) {

    char c = str.charAt(i);


    //Skip any whitespace
    if( " \t\n\r".indexOf(c) > -1 ) {
        ++i;
        continue;
    }


    switch(state) {

    //Reading Key
    case 0:
        if( c != '=' ) {
            buffer += c;
        } else {
            //Go read a value.
            key = buffer;
            state = 1;
            buffer = "";
        }
        ++i;
        break;

    //Reading value
    case 1:

        //Opening bracket
        int pos = openBrackets.indexOf(c);
        if( pos != -1 ) {
            stack.push(pos);
            ++i;
            break;
        }

        //Closing bracket
        pos = closeBrackets.indexOf(c);
        if( pos != -1 ) {

            if( stack.size() == 0 ) {
                throw new RuntimeException("Syntax error: Unmatched closing bracket '" + c + "'" );
            }

            int pos2 = stack.pop();
            if( pos != pos2 ) {
                throw new RuntimeException("Syntax error: Unmatched closing bracket, expected a '"
                        + closeBrackets.charAt(pos2) + "' got '" + c );             
            }
            ++i;
            break;
        }

        //Handling separators 
        if( c == ',' ) {
            if( stack.size() == 0 ) {
                //Put the pair in the map.
                map.put(key, buffer);

                //Go read a new Key.
                state = 0;
                buffer = "";
                ++i;
                break;
            }                       
        }

        //else
            buffer += c;
            ++i;


        } //switch
} //while
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Note: Wrote that way, it will also remove ANY white space. –  Sharpie Apr 19 '13 at 9:19
  1. split the given string with String.split(",");
  2. Now split each element of the array with String.split("=");
share|improve this answer
7  
And how to deal with the , within the [], which is supposed to be part of the value? –  Till Helge Apr 19 '13 at 8:01

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