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enter code hereI have this propert in a .cs file. When ever I set this property a event associated with it gets fired.

    public event Action ResponseReceived;
    private string response;

    public string Response
    {

        get
        {
            return response;
        }

        set
        {
                response = value;
                if (ResponseReceived != null) { ResponseReceived(); }
        }

    }

Now problem is that in another file when I do

ResponseReceived += new Action(function_ResponseReceived);
void function_ResponseReceived()
{
    //change to gui thread
    if (InvokeRequired) 
    {   
        this.BeginInvoke(new Action(function_ResponseReceived), new object[] { }); 
        return; 
    }

    textBox1.Text = Response;
}


Response = "yes";

. . . (after some lines) . . .

Response = "no";

But yes does not fire the funcion associated with the event as Response = "no"; always fires (The Response field is updated faster than the time it takes to fire event so it is over-written, i guess) . Is there a way that both times when I set property the function asscoiated with the event fires properly

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closed as too localized by dtb, IronMan84, rekire, luke, Cole Johnson Apr 19 '13 at 14:09

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Can you add a short but complete program that demonstrates the problem? –  dtb Apr 19 '13 at 8:36
3  
I think the answer to your question may lie in the part you have so nonchalantly disimissed with "after some lines" –  saj Apr 19 '13 at 8:37
1  
Please show the code where you subscribe to (or unsubscribe from) ResponseReceived –  Thomas Levesque Apr 19 '13 at 8:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

INITIAL ANSWER:

The code as you show it works fine.
There must be something in your code where your mentioned '. . . (after some lines) . . .'.

Testcode:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;    

namespace FunctionAssociatedPropertyFire {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            new TestClass().Test();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
    class TestClass {
        public event Action ResponseReceived;
        private string response;    
        public string Response {
            get { return response; }    
            set {
                response = value;
                if (ResponseReceived != null) { ResponseReceived(); }
            }
        }

        void function_ResponseReceived() {
            Console.WriteLine("function_ResponseReceived");
        }

        public void Test() {
            ResponseReceived += new Action(function_ResponseReceived);
            Console.WriteLine("BeforeYes");
            Response = "yes";
            Console.WriteLine("AfterYes");
            Response = "no";
            Console.WriteLine("AfterNo");
        }
    }
}

Testresult:

BeforeYes
function_ResponseReceived
AfterYes
function_ResponseReceived
AfterNo

UPDATE:

You are invoking asynchronously, so the invoking code doesn't wait for the invoked method to finish. You can try to use the Invoke-method instead of the BeginInvoke-method.

void function_ResponseReceived() {
    //change to gui thread
    if (InvokeRequired) 
    {   
        this.Invoke(new Action(function_ResponseReceived), new object[] { }); 
        return; 
    }

    textBox1.Text = Response;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I edited the post. In the function associated with the event I am changing to gui thread as I am on another thread. I guess here problem lies. Whats your thoughts on it ? –  saam Apr 19 '13 at 9:18
    
How are you so sure the eventhandler is not executed the first time? Have you debugged? –  Maarten Apr 19 '13 at 9:39
    
Yes i did. When the thread is changed to gui at that point mostly 'response' field is updated to the new value and the new value is written to gui textbox instead of the old one. Although a couple of times the old value was also written. But it was very rare –  saam Apr 19 '13 at 9:52
1  
See my updated answer. –  Maarten Apr 19 '13 at 9:59
    
pure awesomeness thanks :) –  saam Apr 19 '13 at 13:50

Your analysis that the Response field is updated faster than the time it takes to fire the event is incorrect.The only way this could happen is if the ResponseReceived delegate is changed on multiple threads, in which case you have a race condition.If you look at the code, each step in that method will get executed serially (ie. one after another) on the same thread.

Something must be resetting or changing the ResponseReceived event - my guess would be that you are setting the event handler after you do whatever it is that is expecting a response, so when the first response comes in, you have not yet set the event handler - the solution in this case would obviously be to set the event handler BEFORE you trigger the action that gets the response.

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Thanks for the reply. I guess you are right about the thread race. I have updated the post plaease have a look. In the function associated with the event I am changing to gui thread as I am on another thread. I guess here problem lies. What you say ? –  saam Apr 19 '13 at 9:19
    
If you debug through it, are you 100% sure that ResponseReceived += new Action(function_ResponseReceived); gets called before Response = "no" ? –  Martin Ernst Apr 19 '13 at 9:29

As long as you don't tamper with ResponseReceived between the 2 lines, the action should be invoked both times.There isn't anything like the field getting updated faster than the method firing.

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