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I'm writing a bash script to automate some sysadmin stuff. I start with checking that a number of variables are the defined. The way I'm doing that now is like so:

function is_defined {
    if [ -z "$2" ]; then
        echo "$1 is not defined"
        exit
    fi
}

is_defined "PROJECTNAME" $PROJECTNAME

What I would love to have is a function that only takes one argument: the variable name as a string, checks that it is defined and if it's not defined tell the user so and exit.

What's the right substitution magic to do this in bash?

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1  
`If the first character of parameter is an exclamation point (!), a level of variable indirection is introduced` - man bash –  sehe Apr 19 '13 at 8:54
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this:

function is_defined {
    if [ -z "${!1}" ]; then
        echo "$1 is not defined"
        exit 1
    fi
}

${!a} as @sehe already stated will print value of variable, which name is $1

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It is possible, with an exotic parameter expansion: ${!var}, which expands to the variable whose name is the $var.

Version 1

is_defined() {
  if [ -z "${!1}" ]; then
    echo "$1 is not defined"
    exit 1
  fi
}

But we can simplify it further:

bash has the ${var?errormsg} parameter expansion among its lesser-known features. It basically means "if var is defined, expand to its value; otherwise, print errormsg, set $? nonzero and skip to next command". errormsg is optional, and defaults to parameter null or not set (but the ? is required). As usual with exotic parameter expansions, it can be modified with a colon (${var:?errormsg}) to also error if the variable has an empty value.

In a non-interactive shell, an error generated by this kind of parameter expansion will abort the shellscript.

Version 2

is_defined() {
  : ${!1:?"parameter $1 null or unset"}
}

Tested on my MinGW bash just then. The : command just ignores all its input, does nothing, and returns success. (This does have the annoying side-effect of polluting your error message by prefixing it with sh: !1:; use at own desire.)

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+1 for ${var?msg} (you should make that version 1). The set -e is not necessary; ${var:?msg} already makes a non-interactive shell exit. –  chepner Apr 19 '13 at 11:56
    
@chepner *facepalm* I'll edit. –  michaelb958 Apr 19 '13 at 11:57
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