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In an attempt to filter the bad words, I found the 'replace' function in java is not as handy as intended. Please find below the code : Eg : consider the word 'abcde' and i want to filter it to 'a***e'.

    String test = "abcde";
    for (int i = 1; i < sdf.length() - 1; i++) {
        test= test.replace(test.charAt(i), '*');
    }
    System.out.print(test);

Output : a***e

But if the String is String test = "bbcde";, the output is ****e. It seems, if the word has repetitive letters(as in here), the replace function replaces the repetitive letters too. Why is it so? I want to filter the words excluding the first and last letter.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to filter bad words from another text, so that "abcde" is a bad word, which has to be filtered ? Or do you only want to get "ae" from input "abcde" and "be" from "bbcde" ? – user2248673 Apr 19 '13 at 9:45
    
i want to get a***e from abcde! Got the answer. Thanks a lot – sree127 Apr 19 '13 at 10:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

That is because String.replace(char, char) replaces all occurrences of the first character (according to its Javadoc).

What you want is probably more like this:

char[] word = test.toCharArray();
for (int i = 1; i < word.lengh - 1; i++) { // make sure to start at second char, and end at one-but-last char
    word[i] = '*';
}
System.out.println(String.copyValueOf(word));
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot :) – sree127 Apr 19 '13 at 10:32

since String.replace(char, char) replaces all occurrences of specified char, this would be a better approach for your requirement:

String test = "abcde";
String replacement = "";
for (int i = 0; i < sdf.length(); i++) {
    replacement += "*";
}
test= test.replace(sdf, replacement );
System.out.print(test);
share|improve this answer

It seems, if the word has repetitive letters(as in here), the replace function replaces the repetitive letters too. Why is it so?

Why? Because that's just how it works, exactly as the API documentation of String.replace(char oldChar, char newChar) says:

Returns a new string resulting from replacing all occurrences of oldChar in this string with newChar.

If you just want to replace the content of the string by the first letter, some asterisks and the last letter, then you don't need to use replace at all.

String test = "abcde";

if (test.length() >= 1) {
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
    result.append(test.charAt(0));
    for (int i = 0; i < test.length() - 2; ++i) {
        result.append('*');
    }
    result.append(test.charAt(test.length() - 1));
    test = result.toString();
}

System.out.println(test);
share|improve this answer
public static void main(String[] args) {

    String test = "bbcde";
    String output = String.valueOf(test.charAt(0));
    for (int i = 1; i < test.length() - 1; i++) {
        output = output + "*";
    }
    output = output + String.valueOf(test.charAt(test.length() - 1));
    System.out.print(output);
}
share|improve this answer

You should use the replaceAll-Function: Link

With this you can replace all times you find a given substring in a string (f.e. "abcde") and replace all these with another string (f.e. "a***e").

String test = "abcde";
String replacement = "";
for (int i = 0; i < test.length(); i++) {
    if (i==0 || i==test.length()-1){
        replacement += test.charAt(i);
    } else {
        replacement += "*";
    }
}
sdf = sdf.replaceAll(test, replacement);
System.out.print(test);
share|improve this answer
1  
This method takes a regular expression and it will replace every match to that regex. So it might behave different than you expect... – mthm Apr 19 '13 at 9:36
    
I think I misunderstood the question ? Didn't he want to find every appearence of the word "abcde" in a given text and replace them with "ae" ? So for example in "blaabcdebla" he wants to receive "blaaebla" ? – user2248673 Apr 19 '13 at 9:42
    
@user2248673 Yes, but you probably want to actually still use replace instead of replaceAll. Otherwise your "ae" will replace anything between any a and any e, and that is definitely not what we want. We know "abcde" is an evil word, but we don't also want to censor "alive" (or for that matter, "ale" and "agriculture", both of which would get caught by "ae"). – corsiKa Jun 27 '13 at 18:49

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