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I have 2 DBs. I want to clear the DB and add new contents. I am using following method.

function updateDB(db, dbInstance, newElements) {
    return dbInstance.forEach(function(oldElement) {
        dbInstance.remove(oldElement);
    }).then(function() {
        console.log('Deleted all rows');
        return db.saveChanges(function() {
            dbInstance.addMany(newElements);
            return db.saveChanges(function(){
                console.log('Added '+newElements.length+' rows');
                return true;
            });
        });
    });
}

Technically, I am calling the above method 2 times. i.e.

return updateDB(db1, db1.dbIns1, newElements1).then(function() {
    return updateDB(db2, db2.dbIns2, newElements2).then(function() {
        return true;
    });
});

The definition of the method is as follows. This is done on load and onready method is called :

   $data.Entity.extend("Db1Name", {
            Id: { type: "string", key: true},
            Name: { type: "string"},
                Values : {type: "string"}
    });

   $data.EntityContext.extend("db1Test", {
                db1Ins: { type: $data.EntitySet, elementType: Db1Name }
   });

   var db1 = new db1Test({ name: "indexedDb", databaseName: "db1Ins" });

When executing this in Firefox I am getting InvalidStateError: A mutation operation was attempted on a database that did not allow mutations. when executing db.saveChanges() more than once. Is this is a code issue ? It works fine in Chrome.

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I look's to be an issue to me... would you mind opening a github ticket on this? –  Peter Aron Zentai Apr 26 '13 at 6:46

1 Answer 1

Your names are misleading, when you call db1 is an instance, db1Ins is an entitiyset, Db1Name is an entitytype. In the function the parameter names are also bad: db is a context, dbInstance is an entityset. I recommend that you use good names.

I do not like mixing callback and promise chains, so let's rewrite it:

 function updateDB(ctx, set, newElements) {
    return set.toArray()
    .then(function(oldElements) {
        oldElements.forEach(function(oldElement) {
            set.remove(oldElement);
        };
        console.log('Deleted all rows');
        return ctx.saveChanges();
    })
    .then(function() {
        set.addMany(newElements);
        return ctx.saveChanges();
    })
    .then(function(l){
         console.log('Added '+l+' rows');
         return true;
     });
 }
share|improve this answer
    
please try with this version –  Gabor Dolla Apr 19 '13 at 15:12

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