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I have example with mutex. CurrentValue - member of Class

int Class::NextValue()
{
   mutex.lock();
   ++CurrentValue;
   ++CurrentValue;
   int localValue = CurrentValue;
   mutex.unlock();
   return localValue;
}

I don't understand why is used localValue. Next code will not work properly?

   ...
   mutex.unlock();
   return CurrentValue;

In case when return is not atomic CurrentValue can change during copy constructor. But in the first code example can be the same with localValue ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

CurrentValue could be changed by another thread between the call to unlock and the function return. But what you really need is a scope guard for the mutex.

C++11:

int Class::NextValue()
{
   std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
   ++CurrentValue;
   ++CurrentValue;
   return CurrentValue;
} // mutex unlocked on exiting this scope.
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1  
@PulsatingAmbience localValue is local to the function, so if another thread calls NextValue, it will see a different localValue. So there's no race condition. –  juanchopanza Apr 19 '13 at 10:24
1  
@PulsatingAmbience yes, exactly! –  juanchopanza Apr 19 '13 at 10:31
1  
@PulsatingAmbience Having read many books/sites re. threading, I suspect I know why you missed it - most threading 'tutorials' are so apallingly bad, or actually wrong, that it is difficult to find words to express the level of suckness. Even a black hole would not suck so much. –  Martin James Apr 19 '13 at 11:30
1  
Alright kids, maybe go to the chat room? Some of us have to work, you know :-) –  juanchopanza Apr 19 '13 at 13:09
1  
@PulsatingAmbience Well, he is so-beauty. –  Martin James Apr 19 '13 at 13:12

The problem is that return CurrentValue; reads CurrentValue outside the protection of the mutex. That means another thread may be writing to it "at the same time". That is a data race, and therefore undefined behaviour.

In any case, the code should be written properly with RAII, and the problem won't even be worth thinking about.

int Class::NextValue()
{
   std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
   ++CurrentValue;
   ++CurrentValue;
   return CurrentValue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
But return localValue; reads localValue outside the protection too? This is the same as with return CurrentValue; ? –  user2298603 Apr 19 '13 at 10:02
2  
localValue is not shared because it's a local variable. Nothing else can even see it, much less write to it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 19 '13 at 10:04
4  
It's a local variable. If you don't know what that is yet, you should not be messing with concurrent code. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 19 '13 at 10:18
2  
The basic problem is that the OP did not uderstand what a thread is: 'It means there are separate call Stack for each thread?'. –  Martin James Apr 19 '13 at 11:11
1  
@PulsatingAmbience what's with the attitude? Have you considered that these people are trying to help answer your question? –  jalf Apr 19 '13 at 11:32

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