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I want to edit a file using sed/awk. The file is made up of several configuration sections, like this:

SECTION 1 BEGIN
some stuff
SECTION END

SECTION 2 BEGIN
some stuff
some more stuff
important line
SECTION END

I want to add important line to the end of SECTION 2 if it doesn't already exist, preferably as a command one liner. I've been looking at the fgrep/sed combo in this question, but I don't quite understand how to adapt it for what I need.

Note: there may be blank lines in the sections.

Many thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using awk:

awk '
  $0 == "SECTION 2 BEGIN" { inSec2 = 1 } 
  inSec2 && $0 == "important line" { hasImportant = 1 } 
  inSec2 && $0 == "SECTION END" { 
    if (!hasImportant) { print "important line" } 
    inSec2 = 0
  }
  1'
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Thanks Michael, that works perfectly. I really need to learn awk, it looks bad ass! –  simon Apr 19 '13 at 10:35
    
Good solution. Just small comments. I think instead of $0 == "..." the shorter /^...$/ could be used. And instead of setting hasImportant in the second condition the inSec2 variable could be cleared. So in the third condition the if statement become useless. Just print the "important line". –  TrueY Apr 19 '13 at 11:02
    
Also "important line" string could be defined once as awk -vimplin="important line" (defining in BEGIN block is longer). Then implin could be used later. –  TrueY Apr 19 '13 at 11:09
1  
@TrueY You suggest enough changes that I'd recommend you just post another solution to show an alternate approach. –  Michael J. Barber Apr 19 '13 at 11:23
1  
@simon Sorry, I don't know really know the details of scripting in tcsh. If you can't figure it out, just save what I've given in my answer in a file, stick #! /bin/sh at the top, make it executable with chmod (or whatever the tcsh equivalent is), and pipe your text through it. –  Michael J. Barber Apr 19 '13 at 14:17

Based on Michael's solution there is a one-liner:

awk -vline="important line" '/^SECTION 2 BEGIN$/{f=1}f&&$0==line{f=0}f&&/^SECTION END$/{print line;f=0}1'<<EOT
SECTION 1 BEGIN
some stuff
SECTION END

SECTION 2 BEGIN
some stuff
some more stuff
SECTION END

SECTION 2 BEGIN
some stuff
some more stuff
important line
SECTION END

SECTION 3 BEGIN
oops
SECTION END
EOT

Output:

SECTION 1 BEGIN
some stuff
SECTION END

SECTION 2 BEGIN
some stuff
some more stuff
important line
SECTION END

SECTION 2 BEGIN
some stuff
some more stuff
important line
SECTION END

SECTION 3 BEGIN
oops
SECTION END
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thanks! What is the <<EOT for? –  simon Apr 19 '13 at 15:15
    
@simon: It is just the "here is the document". Same as if You write the lines between the awk and the last EOT line to a file and You do a <filename to awk. It is easy to show examples in one... –  TrueY Apr 19 '13 at 16:04

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