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What will happen if Microdata and RDFa both are on a webpage? What I can tell from my experience from a class of web pages where I have implemented Microdata where RDFa contents was already there is that Google possibly does not read Microdata. I see one element down the hierarchy is not correct according to Rich Snippet tool but still many things Google can read according to that tool.

Want to know the exact reason, why Google has not taken those Microdata into search result?

The Rich Snippet tool view of my page is here.

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You should ask Google why they process a page the way they process it. Others may use only the microdata, or use neither or both. I don't think there is a single correct answer. –  Ben Companjen Apr 19 '13 at 13:02
    
Expertise overflows here at StackOverflow. So, asked. –  Satya Prakash Apr 20 '13 at 17:37

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Nothing special will happen. However, as you observed, there may be parties that only read one format (and others read only the other format, or both, or neither). I think the processors of RDFa and microdata will (eventually) all read all formats, so it shouldn't matter which you pick.

The help page says

You can use microformats, microdata, or RDFa to mark up your content. However, you should pick one markup standard and use it consistently across the page.

This suggests you should pick one, but no exact reason is given. I can't give an exact reason, because I don't work for Google.

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I think if two are picked and both are describing same things then something unusual can happen. What the search engine prefer is something to know! –  Satya Prakash Apr 28 '13 at 7:11

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