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We have a singleton class in one of our static libraries. It is a singleton because we want to be able to "remember" its state at all times. In essence it is a User management singleton.

It has a property User *user and it has methods such as - (void)authenticateUser.

We want to deliver this to a client who will want to create their own - (void)authenticateUser method. To do this I envisioned they would extend the UserManager class and just override the method.

However as it is a singleton it has methods like: - (id)sharedInstance and a custom alloc method. They all look like this:

static UserManager *_sharedInstance = nil;

+ (id)sharedInstance {
    @synchronized([UserManager class]) {
        if(!_sharedInstance){
            id temp = [[self alloc] init];
            [temp class];
        }
        return _sharedInstance;
    }
    return nil;
}

+ (id)alloc {
    @synchronized([UserManager class]) {
        NSAssert(_sharedInstance == nil, @"Attempted to allocate a second instance of a singleton");
        _sharedInstance = [super alloc];
        return _sharedInstance;
    }
    return nil;
}

So given this, is it possible to subclass and extend this UserManager class? Can I create a ChildUserManager which overrides a function? Or will I have to rewrite these singleton methods to deal with the "new" child class?

Is there any way that I can modify these methods to make it so that 3rd parties can easily extend this class?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
If the static is not inside alloc, you risk someone setting it. –  Jano Apr 19 '13 at 11:21
    
Presumably as the static is within the implementation it is not available outside of this class? –  Thomas Clayson Apr 19 '13 at 11:40
    
True, sorry, it's only visible in its compilation unit. –  Jano Apr 19 '13 at 12:03
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Beter design would be to use Composition then Inheritance. Declare a protocol AuthenticationDelegate

@protocol AuthenticationDelegate
@optional
-(void) authenticateUser:(User*)inUser;
@end

Have a property in UserManager that by default points to UserManager.

@class UserManager : NSObject <AuthenticationDelegate> {
    ......
} 

@property (assign) id<AuthenticationDelegate>  authenticator

+ (id)sharedInstance;

Your clients if they want to authenticate by their method then they must confirm themselves to AuthenticationDelegate protocol and implement its methods. They must set authenticator property to their class that confines to . However its singleton. So they can set it as soon as their object is instantiated. Hence they can use their Authenticator.

But make it sure that authenticator dosent point to nil. You can implement the setAuthenticator: method so that authenticator will be pointing to UserManager when clients set this to nil.

static UserManager *_sharedInstance = nil;

@implementation UserManager

@synthasize authenticator;

+ (id)sharedInstance {
    @synchronized([UserManager class]) {
        if(!_sharedInstance){
            id temp = [[self alloc] init];
            [temp class];
        }
        return _sharedInstance;
    }
    return nil;
}

+ (id)alloc {
    @synchronized([UserManager class]) {
        NSAssert(_sharedInstance == nil, @"Attempted to allocate a second instance of a     singleton");
        _sharedInstance = [super alloc];
        return _sharedInstance;
    }
    return nil;
}

-(void)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.authenticator = nil;
    }
}

-(void)setAuthenticator:(id<AuthenticationDelegate>)inAuthenticator {
    if (!inAuthenticator) {
        __authenticator = self;
    } else {
        __authenticator = inAuthenticator;
    }
}

#pragma mark - AuthenticationDelegate

-(void) authenticateUser:(User*)inUser
{
    // Your Authentication Code.
}

Hope this helps...

share|improve this answer
    
This is quite an interesting answer. I guess one downside is that most of our classes and methods have to be extendable/overridable, not just that one method, and so implementing this functionality for everything might be a little bit onerous. But its an interesting idea and one which I will explore a little more, see if there's a way it can be done. –  Thomas Clayson Apr 19 '13 at 13:32
    
why do you use @synchronized if iOS environment is easily managed - you can control one access at a time ? or do you prefer generalize ? –  seufagner Mar 19 at 13:02
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A better singleton pattern:

// UserManager.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface UserManager : NSObject

+(instancetype)sharedInstance;

// clue for improper use (produces compile time error)
+(instancetype) alloc __attribute__((unavailable("alloc not available, call sharedInstance instead")));
-(instancetype) init  __attribute__((unavailable("init not available, call sharedInstance instead")));
+(instancetype) new   __attribute__((unavailable("new not available, call sharedInstance instead")));

@end


// UserManager.m

#import "UserManager.h"

@implementation UserManager

+(instancetype) sharedInstance {
    static dispatch_once_t pred;
    static id shared = nil;
    dispatch_once(&pred, ^{
        shared = [[super alloc] initUniqueInstance];
    });
    return shared;
}

-(instancetype) initUniqueInstance {
    return [super init];
}

@end

If you subclass, the single instance will be set to whatever is called first, eg:

[Animal sharedInstance];    // instance set to Animal
[[Cow sharedInstance] moo]; // unknown selector 'moo' because the instance is Animal

This alone would work tho:

[[Cow sharedInstance]moo];
share|improve this answer
    
Are you saying that what I'm asking in my question isn't possible with a singleton? Therefore I should make it into a standard object? Or are you just giving me some advice on the use of singletons? –  Thomas Clayson Apr 19 '13 at 11:20
    
In Objective-C you can't prevent a client from creating n instances of a singleton using runtime functions. There is a better idiom for singletons using dispatch_once. Extending a singleton is a bit weird, you have to admit. Being Objective-C so dynamic, there is no much point in having abstract classes, and even when you can disable the init method, IMO is better if you document the class and let client's common sense do the rest. –  Jano Apr 19 '13 at 11:29
    
hmm... ok. Definitely food for thought. I might look into it and see how much work it will be to undo it all! :) thanks –  Thomas Clayson Apr 19 '13 at 11:40
    
An example: Apple uses singletons, like [NSApplication sharedInstance] but in its private API there is a common -(id)init. Just a matter of documentation. Subclassing NSApplication doesn't require anything special, but it's setup so it logs an assertion error if you create two instances, same as your alloc method I guess. –  Jano Apr 19 '13 at 12:06
    
Yeah, really I just want to be able to allow clients to set the user property so that it remembers it for them (and manages the user session) so they don't have to implement all of that themselves, so I guess your way would work just as well, I just need to find a better way to "remember" properties. Possibly using NSUserDefaults, or static properties. –  Thomas Clayson Apr 19 '13 at 13:17
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