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I've made a simple function to print out a times table chart depending on the number you decide to run with. The problem I'm having due to my basic understanding of the language is why it only returns the first loop and nothing else.

def timestables(number):
  for a in range(1, number+1):
    b = a*a
    c = a
    return (str(c) + " * " + str(c) + " = " + str(b))

print(timestables(5))

I get the answer ..

1 * 1 = 1

I've tried to rectify this issue by using print instead of return but this ultimately results with a None appearing as well.

def timestables(number):
  for a in range(1, number+1):
    b = a*a
    c = a
    print (str(c) + " * " + str(c) + " = " + str(b))

print(timestables(5))

I get the answer ..

1 * 1 = 1
2 * 2 = 4
3 * 3 = 9
4 * 4 = 16
5 * 5 = 25
None

How can I return all given results from the for loop to avoid a None error?

share|improve this question
    
indentation is significant in python. please fix the indentation in your post –  shx2 Apr 19 '13 at 11:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're returning inside the for loop - and functions stop execution immediately once they hit a return statement.

To work around this, you can use a list to store those values, and then return that list.

def timestables(number):
    lst = []
    for a in range(1, number+1):
        b = a*a
        c = a
        lst.append(str(c) + " * " + str(c) + " = " + str(b))
    return lst

As a side note, you should use string formatting to build the string, like so.

lst.append('{a} * {a} = {b}'.format(a=a, b=a*a))

Now we can get rid of all those intermediate variables (b and c), and we can use a list comprehension instead.

def timestables(number):
    return ['{a} * {a} = {b}'.format(a=a, b=a*a) for a in range(1, number+1)]

If you don't want the function to return a list, but a multi-line string, you can use str.join:

def timestables(number):
    return '\n'.join('{a} * {a} = {b}'.format(a=a, b=a*a) for a in range(1, number+1))

Now we can test the function:

>>> print(timestables(5))
1 * 1 = 1
2 * 2 = 4
3 * 3 = 9
4 * 4 = 16
5 * 5 = 25
share|improve this answer
    
Good point with string formatting! –  Secator Apr 19 '13 at 11:11
1  
Would be better with yield or a generator expression than building a list, but +1 for explaining why return doesn't do what the OP expects. –  lvc Apr 19 '13 at 11:53
    
Thanks for your detailed response, it looks much cleaner!! I'm trying to figure out how to get this desired result by only using a print function however. –  Ergo Apr 19 '13 at 13:21
1  
@user2298739 see the update –  Volatility Apr 19 '13 at 13:32
    
Appreciate the edit, cheers for that Volatility :) –  Ergo Apr 20 '13 at 8:50

yield them.

def timestables(number):
  for a in range(1, number+1):
    yield '%s + %s = %s' % (a, a, a*a )

for x in timestables(5):
  print x

This turns your function into a generator function, and you need to iterate over the results, i.e. the result is not a list, but an iterable.

If you need a list, the simplest is to explicitly create one:

res = list(timestables(5))

But again, if you don't, you don't.

IMHO, this is the most pythonic way.

share|improve this answer
1  
Was just typing this, you beat me to it. –  DuncanACoulter Apr 19 '13 at 11:12
    
...except that using string formatting would make it more pythonic (a lot simpler as well) –  Volatility Apr 19 '13 at 11:17
    
@Volatility, yes I agree. except that this question is about the loop, not the strings... –  shx2 Apr 19 '13 at 11:19

You can return an array:

def timestables(number):
    out = []
    for a in range(1, number+1):
        b = a*a
        c = a
        out.append( str(c) + " * " + str(c) + " = " + str(b))

    return out
print(timestables(5))
share|improve this answer
    
I wish to retain the current format rather than convert it into a list. Thanks for your response though! –  Ergo Apr 19 '13 at 12:59
    
You can always join the list to convert it to string '\n'.join(out) –  Secator Apr 19 '13 at 14:06

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