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How would you explain that empty regex and empty capturing group regex return string length plus one results?

Code

public static void main(String... args) {
    {
        System.out.format("Pattern - empty string\n");
        String input = "abc";
        Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("");
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(input);
        while (matcher.find()) {
            String s = matcher.group();
            System.out.format("[%s]: %d / %d\n", s, matcher.start(),
                    matcher.end());
        }
    }
    {
        System.out.format("Pattern - empty capturing group\n");
        String input = "abc";
        Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("()");
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(input);
        while (matcher.find()) {
            String s = matcher.group();
            System.out.format("[%s]: %d / %d\n", s, matcher.start(),
                    matcher.end());
        }
    }
}

Output

Pattern - empty string
[]: 0 / 0
[]: 1 / 1
[]: 2 / 2
[]: 3 / 3
Pattern - empty capturing group
[]: 0 / 0
[]: 1 / 1
[]: 2 / 2
[]: 3 / 3
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Could you try to print the start and end offset of each captured group? –  YMomb Apr 19 '13 at 11:18
    
@YMomb Updated. –  Vitaly Apr 19 '13 at 11:31
    
Thanks, the answers are corroborated by the provided start and ends. –  YMomb Apr 19 '13 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Regex engines consider positions before and after characters, too. You can see this from the fact that they have things like ^ (start of string), $ (end of string) and \b word boundary, which match at certain positions without matching any characters (and therefore between/before/after characters). Therefore we have the N-1 positions between characters that have to be considered, as well as the first and last position (because ^ and $ would match there respectively), which gives you N+1 candidate positions. All of which match for a completely unrestrictive empty pattern.

So here are your matches:

" a b c "
 ^ ^ ^ ^

Which is obviously N+1 for N characters.

You will get the same behavior with other patterns that allow zero-length matches and don't actually find longer ones in your pattern. For instance, try \d*. It cannot find any digits in your input string, but * will gladly return zero-length matches.

share|improve this answer
    
There are only two positions "between characters". –  Vitaly Apr 19 '13 at 11:23
    
@Vitaly sorry, that was not accurately formulated then. but the positions before the first and after the last character are obviously also considered, since you have the anchors ^ and $ which match in these postions. –  Martin Büttner Apr 19 '13 at 11:24

The regex engine is hardcoded to advance one position upon a zero-length match (otherwise infinite loop). Your regex matches a zero-length substring. There are zero-length substrings between every character (think the "gaps between each character"); in addition, the regex engine considers the start and end of the string valid match positions as well. Because a string of length N contains N+1 gaps between letters (counting the start and end, which the regex engine does), you'll get N+1 matches.

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