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Project Euler problem 9. I tried to solve it, infact I get triplets which are not Pythagorean triplets and their sum is 1000, Why? I made sure they were Pythagorean triplets. Here is my long and not so optimized code:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int a,b,c; //Decalring the triplets...
    a=1; //First triplet starts with 3
    b=1;
    int c2;//c square

    while(true)
    {
        for(b=1;b<a;b++){
        c2 = a*a+b*b;
        c = sqrt(c2);
        if(c*c == c2 && a+b+c==1000)
        {
            cout<<a<<","<<b<<","<<c<<"\n";
        }
        a++;
        }
        b++;
    }
}

Final working code:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int x,y,z,a;
    for(x=1;x<=1000;x++)
    {
        for(y=1;y<=1000;y++)
        {
            a = x*x+y*y;
            z=sqrt(a);
            if(z*z==a && x+y+z==1000 && x<y){
            cout<<x<<","<<y<<","<<z<<"."<<"\n";
            cout<<"So the product of all of the three triplets is "<<x*y*z;
            }
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't you be checking that sqrt(c2) is integral? –  Angew Apr 19 '13 at 11:45
    
I did, It gives me no result then... :/ –  Rohanchrome Apr 19 '13 at 11:48

2 Answers 2

Your loop conditions are off. The c corresponding to the current a and b is computed inside the loop. Therefore, you cannot test the loop iteration on the value of c because it's an old one. Remove c from the conditions, put back the test for integrality of sqrt(c2), and you have a solution.

EDIT

You seem to be trying to get results by doing more or less random code changes. That is not going ot get you anywhere.

Start by clearly formulating your algorithm in plain human language. Then re-word it into a (still plain human language) structure matching C++ code concepts. Then code those concepts.

Something like this:

Step 1. In a Pythagorean triplet, the third member c is fully determined by the first two. So I will examine all possible values of a and b, and if they form a Pythagorean triplet, test it for sum of 1000.

Step 2. For each a, I will test all bs larger than the a such that a + b is less than 1000. I will compute c2 and see if it's a square. If so, I will test the sum of the triplet.

Step 3.

#include <cmath>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  for (int a = 3; a < 1000; ++a) {
    for (int b = a + 1; a + b < 1000; ++b) {
      int c2 = a * a + b * b;
      int c = std::sqrt(c2);
      if (c * c == c2) {
        if (a + b + c == 1000) {
          std::cout << "Found triplet " << a << ", " << b << ", " << c << '\n';
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Updated the post, But the triplets don't show up :/ –  Rohanchrome Apr 19 '13 at 12:15
    
@Rohanchrome Well, now you're only testing triplets where b == a + 1. You should loop b as well. –  Angew Apr 19 '13 at 12:16
    
Sorry, updated the post with two loops, Same result :/ –  Rohanchrome Apr 19 '13 at 12:22
    
@Rohanchrome I've updated the answer. –  Angew Apr 19 '13 at 12:44
    
Thanks man! That did it! :D I started out fresh and it worked like a charm :D –  Rohanchrome Apr 19 '13 at 12:57

You should check to make sure that c2 is actually a square. One way of doing this is to check whether c*c == c2 after you've taken the square root.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I tried it, But that gives me no result :/ Probably something wrong with my logic? –  Rohanchrome Apr 19 '13 at 11:48
    
@Rohanchrome: The loop condition on the outermost loop looks fishy. a and c will change in response to b within the loop, so you should probably only be checking b in the condition of the while loop. –  hammar Apr 19 '13 at 12:03
    
What should be the condition? b<=1000? –  Rohanchrome Apr 19 '13 at 12:06
1  
@Rohanchrome: It can be made stricter than that (hint: use the triangle inequality), but yes, that should work, I think. –  hammar Apr 19 '13 at 12:09
1  
What is the simplest thing that could possibly work? Two loops both going from 1 to 1000. The inner if will discard anything that doesn't work. Once you've got that working, you can try to be more clever by using identities such as a < b, a + b + c <= 1000 and the triangle inequality, or even Euclid's formula, but there is no shame in starting simple. And for this small problem, it'll likely be more than fast enough in either case. –  hammar Apr 19 '13 at 12:36

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