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I'm trying to convert the 8 bits of a char to the least significant bits of an int. I know that the conversion from char to int is easy doable via

int var = (int) var2;

where var2 is of type char (or even without putting (int)).

But I wonder, if I write the code above, are the remaining highest significant (32-8=) 24 bits of the int just random or are they set to 0?

Example: Let var2 be 00001001, if I write the code above, is var then 00000000 00000000 00000000 00001001?

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No. Remaining bits must be 00000000 00000000 –  Mani Apr 19 '13 at 11:50
    
signed char and Value is not the case when negative. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 19 '13 at 11:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm trying to convert the 8 bits of a char to the least significant bits of an int

A char isn't guaranteed to be 8 bits. It might be more. Furthermore, as others have mentioned, it could be a signed integer type. Negative char values will convert to negative int values, in the following code.

int var = (int) var2;

The sign bit is considered to be the most significant, so this code doesn't do what you want it to. Perhaps you mean to convert from char to unsigned char (to make it positive), and then to int (by implicit conversion):

int var = (unsigned char) var2;

If you foresee CHAR_BIT exceeding 8 in your use case scenarios, you might want to consider using the modulo operator to reduce it:

int var = (unsigned char) var2 % 256;

But I wonder, if I write the code above, are the remaining highest significant (32-8=) 24 bits of the int just random or are they set to 0?

Of course an assignment will assign the entire value, not just part of it.

Example: Let var2 be 00001001, if I write the code above, is var then 00000000 00000000 00000000 00001001?

Semantically, yes. The C standard requires that an int be able to store values between the range of -32767 and 32767. Your implementation may choose to represent larger ranges, but that's not required. Technically, an int is at least 16 bits. Just keep that in mind.

For values of var2 that are negative, however (eg. 10000001 in binary notation), the sign bit will be extended. var will end up being 10000000 00000001 (in binary notation).

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C11 (n1570), § 6.5.4 Cast operators

Preceding an expression by a parenthesized type name converts the value of the expression to the named type.

Therefore, the remaining of var are set to 0.

By the way, the explicit cast is unecessary. The conversion from char to int is implicit.

C11 (n1570), § 6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers

If an int can represent all values of the original type (as restricted by the width, for a bit-field), the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions.

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Ok, and what about if I use pointers, e.g. something like int var = *((int *) var2); does that hold also in that case? –  navige Apr 19 '13 at 11:54
3  
@navititious: Your example leads to an undefined behavior, since it breaks the strict aliasing rule. An object that have char type shall be accessed with an lvalue that have ((un)signed) char type. int is not allowed in that case. –  md5 Apr 19 '13 at 11:57
1  
Ok! Thanks a lot for clarification! Very helpful! –  navige Apr 19 '13 at 11:58
2  
this answer is incomplete, since it doesn't take into account the signed-ness of the char type (it's implementation defined), and ignores which signed representation is used (also implementation defined) –  Sander De Dycker Apr 19 '13 at 12:19
    
@Kirilenko ... unless it is suitable aligned to store an int, and the underlying representation doesn't form a trap. –  undefined behaviour Apr 19 '13 at 12:22

A C/C++ compiler can choose for the char type to be either signed or unsigned.

If your compiler defines char to be signed, the upper bits will be sign-extended when it is cast to an int. That is, they will either be all zeros or all ones depending on the value of the sign bit of var2. For example, if var2 has the value -1 (in hex, that's 0xff), var will also be -1 after the assignment (represented as 0xffffffff on a 32-bit machine).

If your compiler defines char to be unsigned, the upper bits will be all zero. For example, if var2 has the value 255 (again 0xff), the value of var will be 255 (0x000000ff).

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For casting a char variable named c to an int:

  • if c is a positive such as 24, then c = 00011000 and after casting it will be fill up by zeros:

    00000000 00000000 00000000 00011000

  • if c is a negative such as -24, then c = 11101000 and after casting it will be fill up by ones:

    11111111 11111111 11111111 11101000

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2  
This assumes a 2's complement representation. –  user529758 Apr 19 '13 at 12:04

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