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please my question are two and very simple

  1. misinterpret enum as is

  2. this idea missing some important abstraction in my code

code example, where oprt.calc(x, y) isn't compilable, with warning cannot find symbol

public enum Operation {

    PLUS {
        public double calc(double x, double y) {
            return x + y;
        }
    },
    MINUS {
        public double calc(double x, double y) {
            return x - y;
        }
    },
    MULTILPLE {
        public double calc(double x, double y) {
            return x * y;
        }
    },
    DIVIDED_BY {
        public double calc(double x, double y) {
            return x / y;
        }
    };

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        double x = 15.25;
        double y = 24.50;
        for (Operation oprt : Operation.values()) {
            System.out.println(x + " " + oprt + " " 
                    + y + " = " + oprt.calc(x, y));
        }
    }
}
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As a side note, this sounds like a perfekt application of Lambda Expressions, an upcomming feature of Java 8. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/… –  sulai Apr 19 '13 at 12:41
    
The error message I get when I load this into eclipse is The method calc(double, double) is undefined for the type Operation which points to the solutions others have provided below. –  Colin D Apr 19 '13 at 12:42
    
+1 I didn't knew that there is something like this with enum. –  JJPA Apr 19 '13 at 12:43
1  
@JJPA, they can also have instance variables and constructor. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html –  Colin D Apr 19 '13 at 12:44
    
@ColinD thanks for the link –  JJPA Apr 19 '13 at 12:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What you miss is abstract declaration of calc() method:

enum Operation {

  PLUS {
      public double calc(double x, double y) {
          return x + y;
      }
  },
  MINUS {
      public double calc(double x, double y) {
          return x - y;
      }
  },
  MULTILPLE {
      public double calc(double x, double y) {
          return x * y;
      }
  },
  DIVIDED_BY {
      public double calc(double x, double y) {
          return x / y;
      }
  };

  **public abstract double calc(double x, double y);**

  public static void main(String args[]) {
      double x = 15.25;
      double y = 24.50;
      for (Operation oprt : Operation.values()) {
          System.out.println(x + " " + oprt + " " 
                  + y + " = " + oprt.calc(x, y));
      }
  }
}
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You need to declare an abstract method double calc(double x, double y) in the enum directly, and override it in every enum member.

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can you please to clarify 2nd part from your answer, and override it in every enum member, is there something safer, another additional, or ..., in compare with the answer by @Adam Dyga –  mKorbel Apr 19 '13 at 12:59
    
No. The code of Adam is what I meant. I like adding the @Override annotation on methods overriding another method, to have an error from the compiler if the base method is renamed, deleted, or changes its signature, but in this particular case, it isn't really useful, except for documentation purpose. –  JB Nizet Apr 19 '13 at 13:02
    
:-) sorry wasn't me clear annotation from that, you are right IDE notified about –  mKorbel Apr 19 '13 at 13:10

The correct syntax to use enum methods is:

private enum Operation {
    PLUS, MINUS, MULTILPLE, DIVIDED_BY;

    public double calc(double x, double y) {
        switch (this) {
        case PLUS:
            return x + y;
        case MINUS:
            return x - y;
        case MULTILPLE:
            return x * y;
        case DIVIDED_BY:
            return x / y;
        }
        return 0;
    }
}

public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {

    double x = 15.25;
    double y = 24.50;
    for (Operation oprt : Operation.values()) {
        System.out.println(x + " " + oprt + " " + y + " = "
                + oprt.calc(x, y));
    }

}
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+1 for Nice implementation! –  NINCOMPOOP Apr 19 '13 at 12:53
2  
Java enums can have abstract methods that can be implemented for each specific enum value; I think that is preferable over your solution with a switch in most cases –  Mark Rotteveel Apr 19 '13 at 13:12
    
can you please explain why the abstract method needs to be present? what is the 'semantic' for this enum design decision? –  Roxana Dec 4 '13 at 14:22

You are overriding calc(), while you have no original calc() method. Either declare an abstract method:

public abstract double calc(double x, double y);

or declare a concrete method with a default implementation:

public double calc(double x, double y)
{
    // ...
}
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It doesn't compile because currently, the calc method only exists in each of the possible values of your enum - but it does not exist on the type Operation itself. That's why your compiler (and mine) doesn't accept it.

So, you need to define the method in the type. Maybe something like this:

public abstract double calc(double x, double y);

Your enum values (PLUS, MINUS, MULTIPLE and DIVIDED_BY each implement that method.

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public double calc(double x, double y){}

is same as

private double calc(double x,double y){}

unless you add calc() method to the enum Operation.As per JLS:

Instance methods declared in these class bodies are may be invoked outside 
the enclosing enum type only if they override accessible methods in 
the enclosing enum type.

So basically , the type of oprt is Operation and as Operationdoesn't have any declaration for method called double calc(double x,double y), you cannot invoke the method using oprt. In short the methods defined in class bodies should be overridden methods, for them to be accessible outside.

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