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I am working in R language. I want to impose condition that if any of the upper diagonal element of a matrix is greater than 0.5 then it prints it in output.

I am using the following code but it prints other than diagonal elements which are not required.

for(i in 1:ncol(X))

for (j in i+1:ncol(X)-i){
if(mat(X)[i,j]>0.5)

#upper.tri(cor(X),diag=F)

cat(i,",",j," th element", " > 50%","\n")
}

Thanks in Advance

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Please provide reproducible example. what is mat function? –  vinux Apr 19 '13 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

which() should be able to work for you here, using the arr.ind argument to return the matrix indices. You can use upper.tri as you thought, and an additional logical selection criterion ( > 0.5) to find those elements that fit your description:

set.seed(3234)
m <- matrix(runif(16),nrow=4)

m
#          [,1]       [,2]      [,3]       [,4]
#[1,] 0.24903346 0.06965592 0.8715103 0.92297359
#[2,] 0.81593852 0.99991663 0.3717652 0.67191551
#[3,] 0.85413490 0.13877853 0.7990082 0.04143296
#[4,] 0.01439058 0.27303603 0.5246000 0.08486883

which(m > 0.5 & upper.tri(m) , arr.ind = TRUE )
#    row col
#[1,]   1   3
#[2,]   1   4
#[3,]   2   4

Note, that this doesn't include the diagonal by default, if you want to include the diagonal, use the diag=TRUE argument like this which(m > 0.5 & upper.tri(m , diag = TRUE) , arr.ind = TRUE )

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Thanks a lot for help. –  itfeature.com Apr 20 '13 at 4:54
    
@imdadullah you are welcome! I wouls suggest that as you seem to be new here that you have a quick glance over the About and FAQ sections of the website to help you get the most out of SO. Welcome to SO! –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 20 '13 at 5:34

1) Note that i+1:ncol(X)-i equals 1:ncol(X) regardless of i (as the two instances of i cancel) which is not likely what you intended.

2) Also note that this can be done without a loop:

# create test matrix
set.seed(123)
m <- matrix(runif(25), 5)

# ix selects large elements
ix <- m > .5 & upper.tri(m)
s <- sprintf("\nm[%d, %d] = %f > 0.5", row(m)[ix], col(m)[ix], m[ix])

which displays as follows:

> cat(s, "\n")

m[1, 3] = 0.956833 > 0.5 
m[1, 4] = 0.899825 > 0.5 
m[1, 5] = 0.889539 > 0.5 
m[2, 5] = 0.692803 > 0.5 
m[3, 5] = 0.640507 > 0.5 
m[4, 5] = 0.994270 > 0.5

The matrix m used above is:

> m
          [,1]      [,2]      [,3]       [,4]      [,5]
[1,] 0.2875775 0.0455565 0.9568333 0.89982497 0.8895393
[2,] 0.7883051 0.5281055 0.4533342 0.24608773 0.6928034
[3,] 0.4089769 0.8924190 0.6775706 0.04205953 0.6405068
[4,] 0.8830174 0.5514350 0.5726334 0.32792072 0.9942698
[5,] 0.9404673 0.4566147 0.1029247 0.95450365 0.6557058
share|improve this answer
    
I left the formatting and printing details to the OP. +1 for a fully worked solution. –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 19 '13 at 13:11
    
An alternative to printing the output would be to display ix*m . I have an easier time visualizing the location of the desired values that way (I know that's not what the OP asked for). –  Carl Witthoft Apr 19 '13 at 13:15
    
@Carl, or perhaps: print(ifelse(ix, "*", " "), quote = FALSE) –  G. Grothendieck Apr 19 '13 at 13:22
    
Thanks a lot for help –  itfeature.com Apr 20 '13 at 4:54

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