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I can't seem to find much information about custom exception classes.

What I do know

You can declare your custom error class and let it inherit from StandardError, so it can be rescued:

class MyCustomError < StandardError
end

This allows you to raise it using:

raise MyCustomError, "A message"

and later, get that message when rescuing

rescue MyCustomError => e
  puts e.message # => "A message"

What I don't know

I want to give my exception some custom fields, but I want to inherit the message attribute from the parent class. I found out reading on this topic that @message is not an instance variable of the exception class, so I'm worried that my inheritance won't work.

Can anyone give me more details to this? How would I implement a custom error class with an object attribute? Is the following correct:

class MyCustomError < StandardError
  attr_reader :object
  def initialize(message, object)
    super(message)
    @object = object
  end
end

And then:

raise MyCustomError.new(anObject), "A message"

to get:

rescue MyCustomError => e
  puts e.message # => "A message"
  puts e.object # => anObject

will it work, and if it does, is this the correct way of doing things?

share|improve this question
1  
Don't rescue Exception => e. It's broader than the default rescue => e which extends from StandardError, and catches everything including Ctrl+C. I'd do rescue MyCustomError => e. –  Ryan Taylor Feb 20 at 17:47
1  
@RyanTaylor I edited my question for the more proper approach. –  MDeSchaepmeester Feb 21 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 26 down vote accepted

raise already sets the message so you don't have to pass it to the constructor:

class MyCustomError < StandardError
  attr_reader :object

  def initialize(object)
    @object = object
  end
end

begin
  raise MyCustomError.new("an object"), "a message"
rescue MyCustomError => e
  puts e.message # => "a message"
  puts e.object # => "an object"
end

I've replaced rescue Exception with rescue MyCustomError, see Why is it bad style to `rescue Exception => e` in Ruby?.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll accept your answer because you showed me the entire syntax. Thanks! –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 20 '13 at 8:22
1  
Here we doing rescue Exception, but why not rescue MyCustomError? –  Dfr Jun 22 '13 at 10:45
    
@Dfr I've updated the code –  Stefan Apr 15 at 6:19
    
@ArupRakshit that link is dead –  jtzero Dec 19 at 15:33

Your idea is right, but the way you call it is wrong. It should be

raise MyCustomError.new(an_object, "A message")
share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I thought that the message you gave was a second parameter to the raise keyword or something. –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 19 '13 at 14:38
    
You redefined initialize to take two arguments. new passes the arguments to initialize. –  sawa Apr 19 '13 at 14:39
    
Or, you can omit the parentheses. –  sawa Apr 19 '13 at 14:40
    
I understand that bit, but the poster of the topic I linked to in my question does it like this: raise(BillRowError.new(:roamingcalls, @index), "Roaming Calls field missing"). So he calls raise with two parameters: a new BillRowError object, and his message. I'm just confused by the syntax... On other tutorials I always see it like this: raise Error, message –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 19 '13 at 14:41
1  
The problem is not with how many arguments you pass to raise; that is pretty much flexible. The problem is that you defined initialize to take two arguments and only gave one. Look in your example. BillRowError.new(:roamingcalls, @index) is given two arguments. –  sawa Apr 19 '13 at 14:48

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