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I'm already developing that project to my family, but now i'm needing to link a Name to another aleatory(remember that the first name i have it) and store only the second name in a variable, remember that this list is a file(*.txt) with some names, but how i can do this? Thanks.

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What the heck are you talking about? –  Marc W Oct 23 '09 at 0:08
    
It's to aleatory select a name that is stored in a file. –  Nathan Campos Oct 23 '09 at 0:10
    
aleatory = randomly here I believe? –  martin clayton Oct 23 '09 at 0:12
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Yes, it's because i'm from Brazil and here we speak: Aleatório, that is the same of ramdom. Sorry. –  Nathan Campos Oct 23 '09 at 0:15
    
Sorry Nathan, read a few times, still don't get it - can you expand a bit? Is the link you mention significant? Or are you just after randomly getting a name from a list of names in a file? –  martin clayton Oct 23 '09 at 0:15
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Okay, you seem to want to get a random name from a file. Assuming these names are on separate lines, here's what you can do (please read about the built-in rand, int and chomp methods in perldoc perlfunc to see how they work):

my @names = <>;
chomp(@names);
my $random_name = $names[int(rand(@names))];

Breaking this down into steps, this is what it does:

  • first, we read in the file. If you pipe the file into your script (like perl myscript.pl < names.txt), you can read directly from STDIN, with <>.
  • then, we remove all the newlines from each line with chomp.
  • now we want to get a random element from the list:
  • @list in scalar context get the number of elements in the list (for example, 4)
  • rand(4): get a random number between 0 and 4 (so we could have a number between 0 and 3.999999...)
  • int(some number from above) that was a floating-point number, so let's round it down (so now we have either 0, 1, 2, or 3: which is exactly the possible array indexes for our list!
  • use that as the array index into @list and we're done!
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It's even easier in Perl6 my $value = @list.pick –  Brad Gilbert Oct 23 '09 at 0:42
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And even overly complex for Perl5: $names[rand @names] will do just fine. –  Randal Schwartz Oct 23 '09 at 0:58
    
yeah I totally didn't intuit that an integer would be coerced from a floating point value for an array index, but after all, Perl DWIM :) –  Ether Oct 23 '09 at 1:00
    
@Ether: welcome to "integer context" :) (Array or list-slice indicies, operands of .. where the other operand is numeric, substr 2nd and 3rd operands, etc.) –  ysth Oct 23 '09 at 2:40
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The English in your question is so bad that I'm having a really hard time understanding what you are asking.

But what about this?

use List::Util qw(shuffle);
my @array = shuffle(<>);
print shift @array;

That reads from STDIN, you can always use open to open a file then use on your file handle.

Here it is with file IO:

use List::Util qw(shuffle);
open my $fh, "<", "out.txt";
my @array = shuffle(<$fh>);
print shift @array;
close $fh;
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Thanks, i'm going to try this and very sorry about my english :( –  Nathan Campos Oct 23 '09 at 0:18
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@Nathan thanks for my "word of the day": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleatoricism –  martin clayton Oct 23 '09 at 0:20
    
When i try to do this i'm getting this error: "suffle" is not exported by the List::Util module –  Nathan Campos Oct 23 '09 at 0:30
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Looks like a typo? Should be "shuffle". –  martin clayton Oct 23 '09 at 0:31
2  
This is pretty wasteful of compute time and the random number generator's entropy. If you want a random stream, shuffle the list. If you just want one random element of the array, just ask for that. –  jrockway Oct 23 '09 at 6:54
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