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So I have made this code, it works almost perfectly. The one thing is that setupListener method returns a error at the end, probably it finds a property I don't want to find. I've been struggling with this for a while, but I clearly don't have that much experience with js to solve it. I have setup some console.log methods for debugging. You use this function like this: setupListener(Id or Class or a Tag name as string, event to watch on as string, and an action);

eg. setupListener('.pun', 'click', function (e){ console.log(e); });

    var getElement = function (onStr) {
    if (onStr.indexOf('.') === 0) {
        onStr = onStr.slice(1);
        return document.getElementsByClassName(onStr);
    } 

    if (onStr.indexOf('#') === 0) {
        onStr = onStr.slice(1);
        return document.getElementById(onStr);
    } 

    if (onStr.indexOf('#') !== 0 && onStr.indexOf('.') !== 0) {
        return document.onStr = document.getElementsByTagName(onStr);
    }
};

var setupListener = function (elementStr, eventStr, action) {
    var tempElement = getElement(elementStr);

        // element a collection and has addEventListener method
        if (tempElement.length > 1 && tempElement[1].addEventListener) {
            for (var i = 1; tempElement.length >= i; i++) {
                if (typeof(tempElement[i].addEventListener) !== "undefined")
                    console.log('1'); //debugging
                    tempElement[i].addEventListener(eventStr, action);
            }   
        }

        // IE < 9 Support
        // element a collection and has NOT addEventListener method
        else if (tempElement.length  > 1 && !tempElement[1].addEventListener) {
            for (var i = 1; tempElement.length >= i; i++) {
                if (typeof(tempElement[i].addEventListener) !== "undefined")
                    console.log('2'); // debugging
                    tempElement[i].attachEvent(eventStr, action);
            }
        }

        // element not a collection and HAS addEventListener method
        else if (!tempElement.length > 1 && tempElement.addEventListener) {
            console.log('3'); // debugging
            tempElement.addEventListener(eventStr, action);
        }

        // element not a collection and has NOT addEventListener method
        // IE < 9 support
        else if (!tempElement.length > 1 && !tempElement.addEventListener) {
            console.log('4'); // debugging
            tempElement.attachEvent(eventStr, action);
        }

    else { 
     console.log('5'); // debugging
    }
};
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3  
Perhaps you should show the exact error you get. Also, tagging it javascript instead of undefined may help drawing the attention from the right (javascript) people. –  Evert Apr 19 '13 at 15:01
1  
Not that jQuery is always the solution, but this code could be easily replaced by $('.some-class').on('click', function () {...code...}); –  zzzzBov Apr 19 '13 at 15:05
    
I am not looking for alternatives I code it to simple practice javascript. The error I get: TypeError: Cannot read property 'addEventListener' of undefined; The code is executed on a #<NodeList> each item has the same class. There are 243 items the (-1) is length property, the (242) is just an html element. So what I did was, before add any event listener check if that node has an .addEventListener, but it didn't do the job. –  Johnny Apr 19 '13 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your problem is in the part of the collection of elements. Note that you get the first element of the array by array[0] so you get the last element by array[array.length-1]. But what you are doing when you are iterating over the arrays is, starting at 1 and iterating to array.length. When you try to access an unavailable array-element (as array[array.length]) you will get undefined, and thats ecaxtly what your error says. So you have to change the bounds in the for-loops. I.e.

for (var i = 0; i < tempElement.length; i++)
share|improve this answer
    
Ohh, my gosh. You are so right. I thought the html elements collections begin with 1. I am pretty sure there was something (dom collection or something) that did not began with 0 but with 1, but what was it? Thank you! –  Johnny Apr 19 '13 at 15:58
    
You are welcome. Would be nice if you could accept the answer as the right one. –  user1983983 Apr 19 '13 at 16:03
    
My pleasure, I am now making sure I don't make such a stupid mistake again. #research –  Johnny Apr 19 '13 at 16:05

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