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How can I pass an entire array to a method?

private void PassArray() {
    String[] arrayw = new String[4];
    //populate array
    PrintA(arrayw[]);
}

private void PrintA(String[] a) {
    //do whatever with array here
}

How do I do this correctly?

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up vote 29 down vote accepted

You do this:

private void PassArray(){
    String[] arrayw = new String[4]; //populate array
    PrintA(arrayw);
}

private void PrintA(String[] a){
    //do whatever with array here
}

Just pass it as other variable. In Java, Arrays are passed by reference.

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1  
so... If I change the array (passed in as parameter) in a method, do I change the values in the original array in caller? – Remian8985 Jul 7 '15 at 22:53
    
@Remian8985 If the array is declared globally or if you're accessing it through its class (e.g, someClass.array), then yes. – TheEyesHaveIt Jul 8 '15 at 3:38
    
yeah arrays are implemented as objects in Java and hence its only just necessary to pass a reference of the array to the method you want to invoke. – AnkitSablok Dec 21 '15 at 2:01

Simply remove the brackets from your original code.

PrintA(arryw);

private void PassArray(){
    String[] arrayw = new String[4];
    //populate array
    PrintA(arrayw);
}
private void PrintA(String[] a){
    //do whatever with array here
}

That is all.

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Oh. I feel stupid now because on my program it wasnt initialized... – Dacto Oct 23 '09 at 0:25
    
Heh, I think we've all done that before. What I'd like to know is why we still have to initialize our objects explicitly. Is there any situation where we WANT a typed null pointer? Even if so, it's definitely an exception rather than the norm. – Daniel T. Oct 23 '09 at 0:31

An array variable is simply a pointer, so you just pass it like so:

PrintA(arrayw);

Edit:

A little more elaboration. If what you want to do is create a COPY of an array, you'll have to pass the array into the method and then manually create a copy there (not sure if Java has something like Array.CopyOf()). Otherwise, you'll be passing around a REFERENCE of the array, so if you change any values of the elements in it, it will be changed for other methods as well.

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Important Points

  • you have to use java.util package
  • array can be passed by reference

In the method calling statement

  • Don't use any object to pass an array
  • only the array's name is used, don't use datatype or array brackets []

Sample Program

import java.util.*;

class atg {
  void a() {
    int b[]={1,2,3,4,5,6,7};
    c(b);
  }

  void c(int b[]) {
    int e=b.length;
    for(int f=0;f<e;f++) {
      System.out.print(b[f]+" ");//Single Space
    }
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    atg ob=new atg();
    ob.a();
  }
}

Output Sample Program

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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You got a syntax wrong. Just pass in array's name. BTW - it's good idea to read some common formatting stuff too, for example in Java methods should start with lowercase letter (it's not an error it's convention)

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Yea i was just in a hurry :) – Dacto Oct 23 '09 at 7:39

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