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In .Net (C# and VB.NET) If i have a multiline text like this:

__   __                 _                       
\ \ / /                | |                      
 \ V /___  _   _ _ __  | |     ___   __ _  ___  
  \ // _ \| | | | '__| | |    / _ \ / _` |/ _ \ 
  | | (_) | |_| | |    | |___| (_) | (_| | (_) |
  \_/\___/ \__,_|_|    \_____/\___/ \__, |\___/ 
                                     __/ |      
                                    |___/       

Can I set the variable like this?

Dim Logo As String = ("
__   __                 _                       
\ \ / /                | |                      
 \ V /___  _   _ _ __  | |     ___   __ _  ___  
  \ // _ \| | | | '__| | |    / _ \ / _` |/ _ \ 
  | | (_) | |_| | |    | |___| (_) | (_| | (_) |
  \_/\___/ \__,_|_|    \_____/\___/ \__, |\___/ 
                                     __/ |      
                                    |___/       ")

Console.WriteLine(Logo)

... instead of this else:

    Console.WriteLine("__   __                                         ")
    Console.WriteLine("\ \ / /                | |                      ")
    Console.WriteLine(" \ V /___  _   _ _ __  | |     ___   __ _  ___  ")
    Console.WriteLine("  \ // _ \| | | | '__| | |    / _ \ / _` |/ _ \ ")
    Console.WriteLine("  | | (_) | |_| | |    | |___| (_) | (_| | (_) |")
    Console.WriteLine("  \_/\___/ \__,_|_|    \_____/\___/ \__, |\___/ ")
    Console.WriteLine("                                     __/ |      ")
    Console.WriteLine("                                    |___/       ")

... or this else :

            Dim Logo As String = ( _
"__   __                 _                       " & vbNewLine & _
"\ \ / /                | |                      " & vbNewLine & _
" \ V /___  _   _ _ __  | |     ___   __ _  ___  " & vbNewLine & _
"  \ // _ \| | | | '__| | |    / _ \ / _` |/ _ \ " & vbNewLine & _
"  | | (_) | |_| | |    | |___| (_) | (_| | (_) |" & vbNewLine & _
"  \_/\___/ \__,_|_|    \_____/\___/ \__, |\___/ " & vbNewLine & _
"                                     __/ |      " & vbNewLine & _
"                                    |___/       ")
share|improve this question
1  
vb.net or c#? and what does this have to do with visual studio? –  p.s.w.g Apr 19 '13 at 15:06
    
Well, c# easy. Just make it verbatim literal –  Silvermind Apr 19 '13 at 15:08
3  
This is so retro looking, I'm expecting people to start talking about AT codes and BBS passwords. –  Jeff Watkins Apr 19 '13 at 15:10
    
@pswg I will learn the way for each –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '13 at 15:13
    
This is something I would instead add as a Resource. –  hometoast Apr 19 '13 at 15:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You (initially) marked this as c#, but show VB code. For c#: use the @ specifier:

string myText =
@"line 1
line 2
line 3"

Note that if you don't want a blank line at the start of your string, make sure you put the @" on the same line as the first line of your text, as I've done above.

For VB.NET, there is no direct support for this, but you can use the nice hack from this answer to get around it:

Dim s As String = <a>line 1
line 2
line 3</a>.Value

Also consider creating a string resource; you can add line breaks in there (ensure you use shift-enter, per the note in this answer), then load the resource using something similar to

Dim myString As String = My.Resources.MyString
share|improve this answer
    
Thankyou for showing examples of each two, great trick! –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '13 at 15:21
    
Depending on the characters in your data you may also want to place an inner XML CDATA Element to prevent Encoding Issues with a couple characters. Eg. <a><![CDATA[your multiline data]]></a>.Value –  DarrenMB Apr 19 '13 at 15:32

In C# you can use raw strings (@), like that:

        private string Logo = @"
__   __                 _                       
\ \ / /                | |                      
 \ V /___  _   _ _ __  | |     ___   __ _  ___  
  \ // _ \| | | | '__| | |    / _ \ / _` |/ _ \ 
  | | (_) | |_| | |    | |___| (_) | (_| | (_) |
  \_/\___/ \__,_|_|    \_____/\___/ \__, |\___/ 
                                     __/ |      
                                    |___/       ";
share|improve this answer
    
thankyou for your answer. –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '13 at 15:17

Use Verbatim strings.

The @ symbol tells the string constructor to ignore line breaks.

See MSDN for more information. String literals vs Verbatim strings

For example

string verbatim = @"v
                    e
                    r
                    batim"

Your example

Dim Logo As String = (@"
__   __                 _                       
\ \ / /                | |                      
 \ V /___  _   _ _ __  | |     ___   __ _  ___  
  \ // _ \| | | | '__| | |    / _ \ / _` |/ _ \ 
  | | (_) | |_| | |    | |___| (_) | (_| | (_) |
  \_/\___/ \__,_|_|    \_____/\___/ \__, |\___/ 
                                     __/ |      
                                    |___/       ")

Console.WriteLine(Logo)
share|improve this answer
3  
not only line breaks, but all specials sybols like \r \n ets. –  Dmitry Martovoi Apr 19 '13 at 15:10
    
@ is verbatim string literal. There are some other literals such as \b ,'a',\n,\r ... @ is generally known as verbatim string, good explanation +1 –  Davut Gürbüz Apr 19 '13 at 15:17
    
thankyou for your answer. –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '13 at 15:19

Yes, you should use @ symbol:

string t = @"t
e
s
t"
share|improve this answer
    
thankyou for your answer. –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '13 at 15:18

Kind of...

It's done like this:

Dim logo = " " & vbCrLf & _
"__   __                                         " & vbCrLf & _
"\ \ / /                | |                      " & vbCrLf & _

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
thankyou for your answer. –  ElektroStudios Apr 19 '13 at 15:18

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